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What is the difference between research studies and quality improvement studies, Explain which has the stronger level of evidence and why?

What is the difference between research studies and quality improvement studies, Explain which has the stronger level of evidence and why?

DQ2 What is the difference between research studies and quality improvement studies? Explain which has the stronger level of evidence and why.

After mixed results from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) strategy, the global agenda recognized the critical role of ensuring not just access but quality of health care delivery. As a result, quality and improvement have become a core focus within the Universal Health Coverage movement to achieve the goal of better population health and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)[1–3]. In low- and middle-income countries, quality improvement (QI) is used to identify performance gaps and implement improvement interventions to address these problems at the local, sub national and national levels. Methods used by these improvement interventions range from process improvements using incremental, cyclically implemented changes appropriate to the local context, to system-level interventions and policies to improve and sustain quality. Regardless of the scope of improvement efforts and methods employed, the impact and spread of QI has often fallen short. Causes of these lost opportunities include how decisions about improvement interventions are made, the methodology for measuring the effectiveness of the intervention, what data are collected and used and how the information on both the implementation and the intervention is communicated to drive spread and knowledge translation []. Practitioners engaged in improvement in their organizations are frustrated by research reviews which often show a lack of conclusiveness about the effectiveness of QI when many of them see the local benefits from their work. Researchers complain about the lack of rigor in the application of QI methods in practice sittings and about poor documentation of the implementation process [].

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There is a growing realization of the need for common ground between implementers and researchers that promotes use of more systematic and rigorous methods to assess the improvement intervention effectiveness when appropriate but does not demand that all QI implementations be subject to the experimental methods commonly considered to be the gold standard of evidence. To explore the causes of this gap and address how to bridge the gap and better engage the targeted consumers of generated knowledge, including communities, governments and funders, a session ‘Better Health Care: How do we learn about improvement?’ was organized by Salzburg Global Seminar (SGS) []. The session brought together experts from a range of fields and organizations, including researchers, improvement implementers from the field, policy makers, and representatives from countries and international organizations.

For a partnership between researchers and implementers to become more consistent in improvement projects and studies, the incentives and priorities of each of these groups need to be better aligned in QI work and its evaluation. In this paper, we build on the Salzburg discussions, existing literature, and our own experience to explore the barriers to collaboration and offer suggestions on how to start to address these barriers. In the spirit of quality improvement, we hope that these recommendations are adopted and tried by groups interested in advancing the research and the practice of QI.

Go to:

Both groups use data to evaluate whether improvements have taken place and are interested in the question of ‘did it work’. However, these gaps have occurred in part because of differences in goals, evidence needs and methods used and incentives for results and dissemination.

What is the difference between research studies and quality improvement studies, Explain which has the stronger level of evidence and why?

What is the difference between research studies and quality improvement studies, Explain which has the stronger level of evidence and why?

Goals

As we consider the major differences between researchers and implementers, we should recognize that there is not a clearly defined dichotomy between these two groups. Rather, those who are focused on in improvement are part of a continuum and are driven by a range of goals from driving and demonstrating local improvements to a focus on attributing these improvements to QI methods that can be generalized and spread, as illustrated in Table Table1,1, which also describes differences in incentives, discussed further below. Organization-based implementers focus on quality improvement projects, where the primary goal is driving change to a local problem to improve care. Policy and decision makers’ goals are broader improvement, needing evidence for current and future decision on what methods and implementation strategies to use. Researchers have a goal of developing new and generalizable knowledge about the effectiveness of QI methods.

Name:  Discussion Rubric

  Excellent

90–100

Good

80–89

Fair

70–79

Poor

0–69

Main Posting:

Response to the Discussion question is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis representative of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

40 (40%) – 44 (44%)

Thoroughly responds to the Discussion question(s).

Is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis representative of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

No less than 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least three current credible sources.

35 (35%) – 39 (39%)

Responds to most of the Discussion question(s).

Is somewhat reflective with critical analysis and synthesis representative of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

50% of the post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least three credible references.

31 (31%) – 34 (34%)

Responds to some of the Discussion question(s).

One to two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed.

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Cited with fewer than two credible references.

0 (0%) – 30 (30%)

Does not respond to the Discussion question(s).

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria.

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Contains only one or no credible references.

Main Posting:

Writing

6 (6%) – 6 (6%)

Written clearly and concisely.

Contains no grammatical or spelling errors.

Adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Written concisely.

May contain one to two grammatical or spelling errors.

Adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Written somewhat concisely.

May contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Contains some APA formatting errors.

0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Not written clearly or concisely.

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Main Posting:

Timely and full participation

9 (9%) – 10 (10%)

Meets requirements for timely, full, and active participation.

Posts main Discussion by due date.

8 (8%) – 8 (8%)

Meets requirements for full participation.

Posts main Discussion by due date.

7 (7%) – 7 (7%)

Posts main Discussion by due date.

0 (0%) – 6 (6%)

Does not meet requirements for full participation.

Does not post main Discussion by due date.

First Response:

Post to colleague’s main post that is reflective and justified with credible sources.

9 (9%) – 9 (9%)

Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Responds to questions posed by faculty.

The use of scholarly sources to support ideas demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

8 (8%) – 8 (8%)

Response has some depth and may exhibit critical thinking or application to practice setting.

7 (7%) – 7 (7%)

Response is on topic and may have some depth.

0 (0%) – 6 (6%)

Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

First Response:

Writing

6 (6%) – 6 (6%)

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Response to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Communication is mostly professional and respectful to colleagues.

Response to faculty questions are mostly answered, if posed.

Provides opinions and ideas that are supported by few credible sources.

Response is written in standard, edited English.

4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Response posed in the Discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Response to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Few or no credible sources are cited.

0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Responses posted in the Discussion lack effective communication.

Response to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.

First Response:

Timely and full participation

5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Meets requirements for timely, full, and active participation.

Posts by due date.

4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Meets requirements for full participation.

Posts by due date.

3 (3%) – 3 (3%)

Posts by due date.

0 (0%) – 2 (2%)

Does not meet requirements for full participation.

Does not post by due date.

Second Response:
Post to colleague’s main post that is reflective and justified with credible sources.
9 (9%) – 9 (9%)

Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Responds to questions posed by faculty.

The use of scholarly sources to support ideas demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

8 (8%) – 8 (8%)

Response has some depth and may exhibit critical thinking or application to practice setting.

7 (7%) – 7 (7%)

Response is on topic and may have some depth.

0 (0%) – 6 (6%)

Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Second Response:
Writing
6 (6%) – 6 (6%)

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Response to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Communication is mostly professional and respectful to colleagues.

Response to faculty questions are mostly answered, if posed.

Provides opinions and ideas that are supported by few credible sources.

Response is written in standard, edited English.

4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Response posed in the Discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Response to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Few or no credible sources are cited.

0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Responses posted in the Discussion lack effective communication.

Response to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.

Second Response:
Timely and full participation
5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Meets requirements for timely, full, and active participation.

Posts by due date.

4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Meets requirements for full participation.

Posts by due date.

3 (3%) – 3 (3%)

Posts by due date.

0 (0%) – 2 (2%)

Does not meet requirements for full participation.

Does not post by due date.

Total Points: 100

Name:  Discussion Rubric

 

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