Want create site? With Free visual composer you can do it easy.

NURS 6501 Knowledge Check Women’s and Men’s Health, Infections, and Hematologic Disorders

NURS 6501 Knowledge Check Women’s and Men’s Health, Infections, and Hematologic Disorders

  • Question 1

    4 out of 4 points

    Correct

    Scenario 1: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

    A 29-year-old female presents to the clinic with a complaint of hirsutism and irregular menses. She describes irregular and infrequent menses (five or six per year) since menarche at 11 years of age. She began to develop dark, coarse facial hair when she was 13 years of age, but her parents did not seek treatment or medical opinion at that time. The symptoms worsened after she gained weight in college. She got married 3 years ago and has been trying to get pregnant for the last 2 years without success. Height 66 inches and weight 198. BMI 32 kg.m2. Moderate hirsutism without virilization noted.  Laboratory data reveal CMP within normal limits (WNL), CBC with manual differential (WNL), TSH 0.9 IU/L SI units (normal 0.4-4.0 IU/L SI units), a total testosterone of 65 ng/dl (normal 2.4-47 ng/dl), and glycated hemoglobin level of 6.1% (normal value ≤5.6%). Based on this information, the APRN diagnoses the patient with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and refers her to the Women’s Health APRN for further workup and management.

    Question

    1.     What is the pathogenesis of PCOS? 

    Selected Answer:

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) has an underlying genetic component that causes irregular ovulation, increased androgens, and ovaries with polycystic characteristics (McCance & Huether, 2019). Glucose intolerance and insulin resistance increase androgen secretion via the ovaries’ supportive structures and reduce sex-hormone-binding globulin (McCance & Huether, 2019). Elevated leptin levels act on the hypothalamus interfering with hormone production. Follicular growth and apoptosis alterations influence the absence of ovulation, creating inappropriate functioning of FSH and LH. Cortical thickening increases subcortical stroma, and hyperplasia occurs (McCance & Huether, 2019)

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal disorder common among women of reproductive age. Women with PCOS may have infrequent or prolonged menstrual periods or excess male hormone (androgen) levels. The ovaries may develop numerous small collections of fluid (follicles) and fail to release eggs regularly.

     

    other factors that may contribute to the development of PCOS include:

    • Excess insulin. Insulin is the hormone produced in the pancreas that allows cells to use sugar, your body’s primary energy supply. If your cells become resistant to the action of insulin, then your blood sugar levels can rise, and your body might produce more insulin. Excess insulin might increase androgen production, causing difficulty with ovulation.
    • Low-grade inflammation. This term describes white blood cells’ production of substances to fight infection. Research has shown that women with PCOS have a type of low-grade inflammation that stimulates polycystic ovaries to produce androgens, leading to heart and blood vessel problems.
    • Excess androgen. The ovaries produce abnormally high androgen levels, resulting in hirsutism and acne. Early diagnosis of PCOS and treatment and weight loss may reduce the risk of long-term complications such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease.

    Complications of PCOS can include: Infertility, Gestational diabetes or pregnancy-induced high blood pressure, miscarriage or premature birth, Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, Metabolic syndrome including high blood pressure, high blood sugar, and abnormal cholesterol or triglyceride levels that significantly increase your risk of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, Sleep apnea, Depression, anxiety and eating disorders, Abnormal uterine bleeding, and cancer of the uterine lining (endometrial cancer). It is important to note that these complications are more severe in overweight women.

     

    Correct Answer:
    Correct 

    The pathogenesis of PCOS has been linked to altered luteinizing hormone (LH) action, insulin resistance, and a possible predisposition to hyperandrogenism. One theory maintains that underlying insulin resistance exacerbates hyperandrogenism by suppressing synthesis of sex hormone–binding globulin and increasing adrenal and ovarian synthesis of androgens, thereby increasing androgen levels. These androgens then lead to irregular menses and physical manifestations of hyperandrogenism. The hyperandrogenic state is a cardinal feature of PCOS but glucose intolerance/insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia often run parallel to and markedly aggravate the hyperandrogenic state, thus contributing to the severity of signs and symptoms of PCOS.

    Response Feedback: [None Given]
  • Question 2

    4 out of 4 points

    Correct

    Scenario 1: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

    A 29-year-old female presents to the clinic with a complaint of hirsutism and irregular menses. She describes irregular and infrequent menses (five or six per year) since menarche at 11 years of age. She began to develop dark, coarse facial hair when she was 13 years of age, but her parents did not seek treatment or medical opinion at that time. The symptoms worsened after she gained weight in college. She got married 3 years ago and has been trying to get pregnant for the last 2 years without success. Height 66 inches and weight 198. BMI 32 kg.m2. Moderate hirsutism without virilization noted.  Laboratory data reveal CMP within normal limits (WNL), CBC with manual differential (WNL), TSH 0.9 IU/L SI units (normal 0.4-4.0 IU/L SI units), a total testosterone of 65 ng/dl (normal 2.4-47 ng/dl), and glycated hemoglobin level of 6.1% (normal value ≤5.6%). Based on this information, the APRN diagnoses the patient with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) and refers her to the Women’s Health APRN for further workup and management.

    Question

    How does PCOS affect a woman’s fertility or infertility? 

    Selected Answer:

    PCOS is the leading cause of infertility in women (McCance & Huether, 2019). Infertility results from alterations in androgen production, follicular disturbances, and an absence of ovulation. In other words, PCOS  negatively impacts fertility because women with the condition do not ovulate or release an egg each month due to an overproduction of estrogen by the ovaries.

    Correct Answer:
    Correct 

    Ovulation problems are usually the primary cause of infertility in women with PCOS. Ovulation may not occur due to an increase in testosterone production or © 2020 Walden University 2 because follicles on the ovaries do not mature. Due to unbalanced hormones, ovulation and menstruation can be irregular. A hyperandrogenic state is a cardinal feature in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Excessive androgens affect follicular growth, and insulin affects follicular decline by suppressing apoptosis and enabling follicle to persist. There is dysfunction in ovarian follicle development. Inappropriate gonadotropin secretion triggers the beginning of a vicious cycle that perpetuates anovulation

    Response Feedback: [None Given]
  • Question 3

    4 out of 4 points

    Correct

    Scenario 2: Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    A 30-year-old female comes to the clinic with a complaint of abdominal pain, foul smelling vaginal discharge, and fever and chills for the past 5 days. She denies nausea, vomiting, or difficulties with bowels. Last bowel movement this morning and was normal for her. Nothing has helped with the pain despite taking ibuprofen 200 mg orally several times a day. She describes the pain as sharp and localizes the pain to her lower abdomen. Past medical history noncontributory. GYN/Social history + for having had unprotected sex while at a fraternity party. Physical exam: thin, Ill appearing anxious looking white female who is moving around on the exam table and unable to find a comfortable position. Temperature 101.6F orally, pulse 120, respirations 22 and regular. Review of systems negative except for chief complaint. Focused assessment of abdomen demonstrated moderate pain to palpation left and right lower quadrants. Upper quadrants soft and non-tender. Bowel sounds diminished in bilateral lower quadrants. Pelvic exam demonstrated + adnexal tenderness, + cervical motion tenderness and copious amounts of greenish thick secretions. The APRN diagnoses the patient as having pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).

    Question:

    1.     What is the pathophysiology of PID? 

    Selected Answer:

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a condition of inflammation related to infections and involves the uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries, and the peritoneal cavity in severe cases. Infections combined with the normal vaginal microbiome’s failure allow the infecting microorganism to spread into the upper genital tract causing PID (McCance & Huether, 2019). Although often caused by gonorrhea or chlamydia, PID’s etiology can be caused by multiple bacteria when the pH of the vagina changes and alter the integrity of the mucus of the cervix (McCance & Huether, 2019). Altering the cervix’s integrity allows an inflammatory process to begin in the uterus and fallopian tubes with edema, obstruction, or necrosis. Gonorrhea pathogens secrete toxins increasing the inflammation and damage, and chlamydia replicates in the cells rupturing the cell membrane, with both pathogens capable of spreading into the abdominal cavity (McCance & Huether, 2019).

    Correct Answer:
    Correct 

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infectious and inflammatory disorder of the upper female genital tract, including the uterus, fallopian tubes, and adjacent pelvic structures. Infection and inflammation may spread to the abdomen, including perihepatic structures. PID is initiated by infection that ascends from the vagina and cervix into the upper genital tract. Chlamydia trachomatis is the predominant sexually transmitted organism associated with PID. Of all acute PID cases, less than 50% test positive for the sexually transmitted organisms such as Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhea. Other organisms implicated in the pathogenesis of PID include, Gardnerella vaginalis (which causes bacterial vaginosis (BV), Haemophilus influenzae, and anaerobes such as Peptococcus and Bacteroides species. Inflammatory responses in the fallopian tubes and uterus causes swelling and sometimes necrosis of the area. This inflammation leads to scarring of the fallopian tubes and causes infertility. N gonorrhoeae is no longer the primary organism associated with PID, but gonorrhea remains the second most frequently reported sexually transmitted disease, after chlamydial infection.

    Response Feedback: [None Given]
  • Question 4

    8 out of 8 points

    Correct

    Scenario 3: Syphilis

    A 37-year-old male comes to the clinic with a complaint of a “sore on my penis” that has been there for 5 days. He says it burns and leaked a little fluid. He denies any other symptoms. Past medical history noncontributory.

    SH: Bartender and he states he often “hooks up” with some of the patrons, both male and female after work. He does not always use condoms.

    PE: WNL except for a lesion on the lateral side of the penis adjacent to the glans. The area is indurated with a small round raised lesion. The APRN orders laboratory tests, but feels the patient has syphilis.

    Question:

    1.     What are the 4 stages of syphilis 

    Selected Answer:

    When syphilis goes untreated, it advances through four stages identified through clinical manifestations. The first stage is the primary stage and consists of bacterial pathogens replicating in the epithelium, producing chancre, and draining into lymph nodes, which stimulates the adaptive immune response (McCance & Huether, 2019). The secondary stage involves a systemic invasion of pathogens with the immune system fighting the infection and clearing the chancres. The latent phase follows the secondary stage. There are no clinical manifestations in this period, although the individual infected transmit the disease if sexually active. In the final phase, the tertiary period, the disease’s systemic manifestations are severe and lead to death. These manifestations include destructive lesions in the skin, bone, and soft tissue and cardiovascular complications such as aneurysm, heart valve malfunctions, and heart failure (McCance & Huether, 2019). Additionally, neurological lesions are possible.

    Correct Answer:
    Correct 

    4-5 . What are the 4 stages of syphilis?

    Answer: Syphilis is an infectious venereal disease caused by the spirochete Treponema pallidum. Syphilis is transmissible by sexual contact with infectious lesions, from mother to fetus in utero, via blood product transfusion, and occasionally through breaks in the skin that come into contact with infectious lesions. If untreated, it progresses through 4 stages: primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary.

    Primary: A chancre, or hard lesion develops at the site of the treponemal entry after exposure. In acquired syphilis, T pallidum rapidly penetrates intact mucous membranes or microscopic dermal abrasions and, within a few hours, enters the lymphatics and blood to produce systemic infection. Incubation time from exposure to development of primary lesions, which occur at the primary site of inoculation, averages 3 weeks but can range from 10-90 days. Secondary syphilis develops about 4-10 weeks after the appearance of the primary lesion. During this stage, the spirochetes multiply and spread throughout the body.

    Secondary syphilis lesions are quite variable in their manifestations. Systemic manifestations include malaise, fever, myalgias, arthralgias, lymphadenopathy, and  rash. Even if untreated, the immune system is usually able to suppress the infection and spontaneous resolution of skin lesions occurs.

    Latent syphilis is a stage at which the features of secondary syphilis have resolved, though patients remain seroreactive. Some patients experience recurrence of the infectious skin lesions of secondary syphilis during this period. About one third of untreated latent syphilis patients go on to develop tertiary syphilis, whereas the rest remain asymptomatic.

    Tertiary syphilis disease is rare. When it does occur, it mainly affects the cardiovascular system (80-85%) and the CNS (5-10%), developing over months to years and involving slow inflammatory damage to tissues. The 3 general categories of tertiary syphilis are gummatous syphilis (also called late benign), cardiovascular syphilis, and neurosyphilis.

    Response Feedback: [None Given]

Week 10: Concepts of Women’s and Men’s Health, Infections, and Hematologic Disorders

Literature, cinema, and other cultural references have long examined differences between women and men. These observations extend well beyond obvious and even inconspicuous traits to include cultural, behavioral, and biological differences that can impact pathophysiological process and, ultimately, health.

Understanding these differences in traits and their impact on pathophysiology can better equip acute care nurses to communicate to patients of both sexes. Furthermore, APRNs who are able to communicate these differences can better guide care to patients, whatever their gender.

Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS ON NURS 6501 Knowledge Check Women’s and Men’s Health, Infections, and Hematologic Disorders

This week, you examine fundamental concepts of women’s and men’s health disorders. You also explore common infections and hematologic disorders, and you apply the key terms and concepts that help communicate the pathophysiological nature of these issues to patients.
Learning Objectives

Students will:

Analyze concepts and principles of pathophysiology across the life span
Analyze processes related to women’s and men’s health, infections, and hematologic disorders
Identify racial/ethnic variables that may impact physiological functioning
Evaluate the impact of patient characteristics on disorders and altered physiology

Learning Resources

Required Readings (click to expand/reduce)

McCance, K. L. & Huether, S. E. (2019). Pathophysiology: The biologic basis for disease in adults and children (8th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Mosby/Elsevier.

Chapter 24: Structure and Function of the Reproductive Systems (stop at Tests of reproductive function); Summary Review
Chapter 25: Alterations of the Female Reproductive System (stop at Organ prolapse); pp. 787–788 (start at Impaired fertility) (stop at Disorders of the female breast); Summary Review
Chapter 26: Alterations of the Male Reproductive System (stop at Hormone levels); Summary Review
Chapter 27: Sexually Transmitted Infections, including Summary Review
Chapter 28: Structure and Function of the Hematological System (stop at Clinical evaluation of the hematological system); Summary Review
Chapter 29: Alterations of Erythrocytes, Platelets, and Hemostatic Function, including Summary Review
Chapter 30: Alterations of Leukocyte and Lymphoid Function, including Summary Review. NURS 6501 Knowledge Check Women’s and Men’s Health, Infections, and Hematologic Disorders

Low, N. & Broutet N. J. (2017). Sexually transmitted infections – Research priorities for new challenges. PLoS Medicine, (12), e1002481

Kessler, C. M. (2019). Immune thrombocytopenic purpura [LK1] (ITP). Retrieved from https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/202158-overview

Nagalia, S. (2019). Pernicious anemia[LK1] . Retrieved from https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/204930-overview#a3

Stauder, R., Valent, P., & Theurl, I. [LK1] (2019). Anemia at older age: Etiologies, clinical implications and management. Blood Journal, 131(5). Retrieved from http://www.bloodjournal.org/content/131/5/505?sso-checked=true

Credit Line: Anemia at older age: Etiologies, clinical implications and management by Stauder, R., Valent, P., & Theurl, I., in Blood Journal, Vol. 131/Issue 5. Copyright 2019 by American Society of Hematology. Reprinted by permission of American Society of Hematology via the Copyright Clearance Center.

Document: NURS 6501 Final Exam Review (PDF document)

Note: Use this document to help you as you review for your Final Exam in Week 11.

Required Media (click to expand/reduce)

Module 7 Overview with Dr. Tara Harris

NURS 6501 Knowledge Check Women’s and Men’s Health, Infections, and Hematologic Disorders Dr. Tara Harris reviews the structure of Module 7 as well as the expectations for the module. Consider how you will manage your time as you review your media and Learning Resources throughout the module to prepare for your Knowledge Check and your Assignment. (3m)

Khan Academy. (2019a). Chronic disease vs iron deficiency anemia[LK1] . Retrieved from https://www.khanacademy.org/science/health-and-medicine/hematologic-system-diseases-2/iron-deficiency-anemia-and-anemia-of-chronic-disease/v/chronic-disease-vs-iron-deficiency-anemia

Note: The approximate length of the media program is 5 minutes.

Online Media from Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children

In addition to this week’s media, it is highly recommended that you access and view the resources included with the course text, Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children. Focus on the videos and animations in Chapters 24, 26, 28, and 30 that relate to the reproductive and hematological systems. Refer to the Learning Resources in Week 1 for registration instructions. If you have already registered, you may access the resources at https://evolve.elsevier.com/

Knowledge Check: Women’s and Men’s Health, Infections, and Hematologic Disorders

In this exercise, you will complete a 10- to 20-essay type question Knowledge Check to gauge your understanding of this module’s content.

Possible topics covered in this Knowledge Check include:
Sexually transmitted diseases
Prostate
Epididymitis
Factors that affect fertility
Reproductive health
Alterations and fertility
Anemia
ITP and TTP
DIC
Thrombocytopeni

Photo Credit: Getty Images

Complete the Knowledge Check By Day 7 of Week 10

To complete this Knowledge Check:

Module 7 Knowledge Check

Module 7 Assignment: Case Study Analysis

An understanding of the factors surrounding women’s and men’s health, infections, and hematologic disorders can be critically important to disease diagnosis and treatment in these areas. This importance is magnified by the fact that some diseases and disorders manifest differently based on the sex of the patient.

Effective disease analysis often requires an understanding that goes beyond the human systems involved. The impact of patient characteristics, as well as racial and ethnic variables, can also have an important impact..

An understanding of the symptoms of alterations in systems based on these characteristics is a critical step in diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. For APRNs, this understanding can also help educate patients and guide them through their treatment plans.

In this Assignment, you examine a case study and analyze the symptoms presented. You identify the elements that may be factors in the diagnosis, and you explain the implications to patient health.

To prepare:

By Day 1 of this week, you will be assigned to a specific case study scenario for this Case Study Assignment. Please see the “Course Announcements” section of the classroom for your assignment from your Instructor.
Assignment (1- to 2-page case study analysis)

In your Case Study Analysis related to the scenario provided, explain the following as it applies to the scenario you were provided (not all may apply to each scenario):

The factors that affect fertility (STDs).
Why inflammatory markers rise in STD/PID.
Why prostatitis and infection happens. Also explain the causes of systemic reaction.
Why a patient would need a splenectomy after a diagnosis of ITP.
Anemia and the different kinds of anemia (i.e., micro and macrocytic).

Day 7 of Week 10

Submit your Case Study Analysis Assignment by Day 7 of Week 10

Reminder: The College of Nursing requires that all papers submitted include a title page, introduction, summary, and references. The sample paper provided at the Walden Writing Center provides an example of those required elements (available at https://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/templates). All papers submitted must use this formatting.
Submission and Grading Information

To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:

Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “M7Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.
Click the Module 7 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
Click the Module 7 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from this area.
Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “M7Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.

Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:

Module 7 Assignment Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:

Submit your Module 7 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 10

To participate in this Assignment:

Module 7 Assignment

What’s Coming Up in Module 8?

Photo Credit: [BrianAJackson]/[iStock / Getty Images Plus]/Getty Images

In Module 8, you will examine pediatric pathophysiology. You will identify diseases, disorders and issues relevant to the treatment of children. You will also take the Final Exam for the course.

Week 11 Knowledge Check: Pediatrics

In the Week 11 Knowledge Check, you will demonstrate your understanding of the topics covered during Module 11. This Knowledge Check will be composed of a series of questions related to specific scenarios provided. It is highly recommended that you review the Learning Resources in their entirety prior to taking the Knowledge Check, since the resources cover the topics addressed. Plan your time accordingly.

Week 11 Final Exam: Pediatrics

Photo Credit: Giii / iStock / Getty Images Plus / Getty Images

In the Week 11 Final Exam, you will demonstrate your understanding of the topics covered during Weeks 7–11 of the course. This Final Exam will be composed of a series of questions related to specific scenarios provided. It is highly recommended that you review the Learning Resources in their entirety prior to taking the Final Exam, since the resources cover the topics addressed. Plan

Next Module

To go to the next module:

Module 8

Results Displayed All Answers, Submitted Answers, Correct Answers, Feedback, Incorrectly Answered Questions

Question 1

1 out of 1 points

Correct

What clinical symptoms are caused by multiple myeloma because the malignant cells reside in the bone marrow and not in the circulating blood?
Selected Answer:
Correct

Hypercalcemia and bone lesions
Answers:
Correct

Hypercalcemia and bone lesions

Hypocalcemia and bone lesions

Hyperkalemia and bone spurs

Hypokalemia and bone spurs
Question 2

1 out of 1 points

Correct

Defective DNA synthesis in bone marrow precursors usually creates erythrocytes that are _____________________.
Selected Answer:
Correct

macrocytic and normochromic
Answers:
Correct

macrocytic and normochromic

microcytic, and normochromic

macrocytic and hypochromic

microcytic and hypochromic
Question 3

0 out of 1 points

Incorrect

Reed-Sternberg cells are the classic abnormal cells in _______________________.
Selected Answer:
Incorrect

Hodgkin lymphoma
Answers:
Correct

Non-hodgkins lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma

Multiple myeloma

Leukemia
Question 4

1 out of 1 points

Correct

Central precocious puberty is driven by what hormone?
Selected Answer:
Correct

GnRH
Answers:

ACTH

FSH

LH

Correct

GnRH
Question 5

1 out of 1 points

Correct

The major symptom of invasive vaginal cancer is vaginal _________________.
Selected Answer:
Correct

bleeding
Answers:

dryness

Correct

bleeding

discharge

atrophy
Question 6

1 out of 1 points

Correct

What type of organism is Chlamydia caused by?
Selected Answer:
Correct

Gram-negative intracellular bacterium
Answers:

Gram-negative diplococci

Anaerobic spirochete

Correct

Gram-negative intracellular bacterium

Gram positive rod
Question 7

1 out of 1 points

Correct

What type of organism is gonorrhea caused by?
Selected Answer:
Correct

Gram-negative diplococci
Answers:
Correct

Gram-negative diplococci

Anaerobic spirochete

Gram-negative intracellular bacterium

Gram positive rod
Question 8

0 out of 1 points

Incorrect

The risk for developing gonorrhea from vaginal or anal intercourse with an infected partner is greater for the receptive partner.

 

Selected Answer:
Incorrect

False
Answers:
Correct

True

False
Question 9

0 out of 1 points

Incorrect

Lactoferrin released by neutrophils during bacterial infection binds iron, thus contributing to iron- deficiency anemia.
Selected Answer:
Incorrect

True
Answers:

True

Correct

False
Question 10

0 out of 1 points

Incorrect

In the bone marrow, hematopoietic stem cells in the osteoblastic niche are active.
Selected Answer:
Incorrect

True
Answers:

True

Correct

False
Question 11

0 out of 1 points

Incorrect

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) begins in the what area of the prostate?
Selected Answer:
Incorrect

periphery
Answers:

periphery

Correct

inner layers

central zone

transition zone
Question 12

1 out of 1 points

Correct

The release of what chemical causes chronic inflammation leading to anemia of chronic disease by decreasing the availability of iron and inhibiting erythroid progenitors?
Selected Answer:
Correct

cytokines
Answers:

macrophages

Correct

cytokines

antibodies

hapten
Question 13

1 out of 1 points

Correct

Platelets that are activated have what shape?
Selected Answer:
Correct

Jagged with spiky edges
Answers:

Smooth and round

Long and narrow

Correct

Jagged with spiky edges

Thick and rugged
Question 14

1 out of 1 points

Correct

How does bacteria reach the prostate to cause acute bacterial prostatitis?

Selected Answer:
Correct

through the urinary tract
Answers:

blood circulation

Correct

through the urinary tract

via the testes

through the epididymis
Question 15

1 out of 1 points

Correct

Which of the following cells are granulocytes?
Selected Answer:
Correct

Neutrophil, basophil, and eosinophil
Answers:

Macrophage, natural killer cell, and lymphocyte

Correct

Neutrophil, basophil, and eosinophil

Monocyte, basophil, and eosinphil

Neutrophil, natural killer cell, and lymphocyte
Question 16

0 out of 1 points

Incorrect

In a patient with polycystic ovary syndrome, the APRN would expect which hormone changes?
Selected Answer:
Incorrect

Increased androgens and decreased estrogens
Answers:

Increased androgens and decreased estrogens

Decreased androgens and increased estrogens

Correct

Increased androgens and increased estrogens

Decreased androgens and decreased estrogens
Question 17

0 out of 1 points

Incorrect

What type of organism is syphilis caused by?
Selected Answer:
Incorrect

Gram-negative intracellular bacterium
Answers:

Gram-negative diplococci

Correct

Anaerobic spirochete

Gram-negative intracellular bacterium

Gram positive rod
Question 18

1 out of 1 points

Correct

Which of the following stimulates bone marrow to produce more platelets?
Selected Answer:
Correct

Thrombopoietin
Answers:

Plasminogen

Correct

Thrombopoietin

Erythropoietin

Plasmin
Question 19

1 out of 1 points

Correct

Iron deficiency anemia is characterized as:
Selected Answer:
Correct

Microcytic-hypochromic
Answers:

Macrocytic-normochromic

Microcytic-normochromic

Macrocytic-hypochromic

Correct

Microcytic-hypochromic
Question 20

1 out of 1 points

Correct

Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder occur during which phase of the menstrual cycle?
Selected Answer:
Correct

luteal
Answers:
Correct

luteal

follicular

ovulation

menstruation

Did you find apk for android? You can find new Free Android Games and apps.