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NSG 6020 Week 9 Assignment 3: Hip Dysplasia

NSG 6020 Week 9 Assignment 3: Hip Dysplasia

Identified the 3 maneuvers to assess for hip dysplasia or dislocation.

Identified the problem-specific questions for the parents.

Identified diagnostic testing and age groups at risk for hip dysplasia or dislocation (pediatrics only).

Used correct spelling, grammar, and professional vocabulary.

Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a condition where the “ball and socket” joint of the hip does not properly form in babies and young children.

It’s sometimes called congenital dislocation of the hip, or hip dysplasia.

The hip joint attaches the thigh bone (femur) to the pelvis. The top of the femur (femoral head) is rounded, like a ball, and sits inside the cup-shaped hip socket.

In DDH, the socket of the hip is too shallow and the femoral head is not held tightly in place, so the hip joint is loose. In severe cases, the femur can come out of the socket (dislocate).

DDH may affect 1 or both hips, but it’s more common in the left hip. It’s also more common in girls and firstborn children.

About 1 or 2 in every 1,000 babies have DDH that needs to be treated.

Without early treatment, DDH may lead to:

With early diagnosis and treatment, children are less likely to need surgery, and more likely to develop normally.

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Diagnosing DDH

Your baby’s hips will be checked as part of the newborn physical screening examination within 72 hours of being born.

The examination involves gently moving your baby’s hip joints to check if there are any problems. It should not cause them any discomfort.

Your baby should have an ultrasound scan of their hip between 4 and 6 weeks old if a doctor, midwife or nurse thinks their hip feels unstable.

Babies should also have an ultrasound scan of their hip between 4 and 6 weeks old if:

  • there have been childhood hip problems in your family (parents, brothers or sisters)
  • your baby was in the breech position (feet or bottom downwards) in the last month of pregnancy (at or after 36 weeks)
  • your baby was born in the breech position after 28 weeks of pregnancy

If you have had twins or multiples and 1 of the babies has any of these risk factors, each baby should have an ultrasound scan of their hips by the time they’re 4 to 6 weeks old.

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