DNP 800 Week 5 Discussion Ethics

Sample Answer for DNP 800 Week 5 Discussion Ethics Included After Question

DNP 800 Week 5 Discussion Ethics

The Doctoral Degree and Professional Nursing Practice  

Doctor of Nursing (DNP) and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees are the highest level of education for the professional nurse.  Even though both degrees are considered lateral by means of education, the focus of each program is unique to the degree. The DNP prepared nurse focuses on practice while the PHD education is based on scientific research (AACN, 2006).   

Doctor of Nursing Practice  

Nursing professionals, who pursue a DNP degree, Focuses on an integrative practice and immense practice experience (AACN, 2006).  Due to the continuous, evolution of the nursing practice, DNP professionals are high in demand. The DNP is recognized to improve the outcomes of the health care delivery system by improving patient outcomes and the knowledge of nurses (Michael & Clochesy, 2016). According to the AACN task force, the DNP role was developed to improve the practice of the expert nurse and to increase and accelerate the evidence of research into practice (Michael & Clochesy, 2016).  

DNP and PHD are terminal degrees for expert nurses.  Collaboration of these to degrees will improve the outcomes in everyday practice.  The PHD professional focuses on the scientific aspect of healthcare and the DNP professional improves outcomes through evidence-based practice.  The PHD professional focuses on the research and design of a specific topic or topics while the DNP professional focuses on priority setting and time management (Conn, 2014).  

DNP is appealing because it also the nurse to improve patient outcomes and integrate new knowledge into practice.  The goal for me as a DNP professional is to focus more on the clinical aspect than research.  Collaboration of both DNP and PHD is needed to provide optimal care, leadership and enhance the education of future practitioners.  

 

References  

American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN). (2006). The essentials of doctoral education for  advanced nursing practice. Washington, DC: Author. Retrieved from  http://www.aacnnursing.org/DNP/DNP-Essentials 

Conn, V. S. (2014). Prepare to launch: Optimizing doctoral education to ensure career success. Western  Journal of Nursing Research, 36(1), 3–5.  

Michael, M. J. & Clochesy, J. M. (2016). From scientific discovery to health outcomes: A synergistic  model of doctoral nursing education. Nurse Education Today, 40, 84- 86.  

A Sample Answer For the Assignment: DNP 800 Week 5 Discussion Ethics

Title: DNP 800 Week 5 Discussion Ethics

DNP 800 Week 5 Discussion Ethics

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Week 5: Ethical Issues Relevant to the Doctorally Prepared Nurse
Nurses encounter ethical issues every day in their practice. The high degree of public confidence only reinforces their responsibility to adhere to established ethical standards. As a DNP- or PhD-prepared nurse, it is especially important to be aware of the multitude of ethical issues that can affect nursing practice and research.
This week, you review ethical codes and standards for nursing practitioners and scholars, and you explore ethical challenges you may encounter in your chosen profession.
Learning Objectives
Students will:
• Analyze key ethical issues relevant to the doctorally prepared nurse
• Summarize required components of doctoral projects at Walden University
________________________________________
Learning Resources
Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.
Required Readings
Houser, J. (2018). Nursing research: Reading, using, and creating evidence (4th ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett.
[For PhD students ONLY]
• Chapter 3, “Ethical and Legal Considerations in Research”

This chapter addresses ethical issues related to nursing research.

Campbell-Crofts, S., Field, J., & Fetherstonhaugh, D. (2013). Ethical considerations for nurses undertaking research with a potentially vulnerable population with chronic kidney disease. Renal Society of Australasia Journal, 9(2), 74-79.

Milton, C. (2010). Nursing ethics and power in position. Nursing Science Quarterly, 23(1), 18-21.

The author discusses what is meant by health care leaders judiciously and transparently addressing ethical challenges.

Suhonen, R., Stolt, M., & Leino-Kilpi, H. (2013). Older people in long-term care settings as research informants: Ethical challenges. Nursing Ethics, 20(5), 551-567. doi:10.1177/0969733012463722

Fouka, G., & Mantzorou, M. (2011). What are the major ethical issues in conducting research? Is there a conflict between the research ethics and the nature of nursing?. Health Science Journal, 5(1), 3-14.

[For PhD students ONLY]

Peirce, A. G., & Smith, J. A. (2008). The ethics curriculum for Doctor of Nursing Practice programs. Journal of Professional Nursing, 24(5), 270-274.

Schrems, B. (2013). Mind the gaps in ethical regulations of nursing research. Nursing Ethics, 20(3), 336-347.

[For PhD students ONLY]

University Office of Research Integrity and Compliance. (2010). Institutional Review Board for ethical standards in research. Retrieved from http://researchcenter.waldenu.edu/Office-of-Research-Integrity-and-Compliance.htm

White, E. (2012). Challenges that may arise when conducting real-life nursing research. Nurse Researcher, 19(4), 15-20.

[For PhD students ONLY]
Required Media
Laureate Education (Producer). (2011a). Ethical issues relevant to the DNP [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 5 minutes.

In this media program, Dr. Joan Stanley discusses the importance of considering multiple perspectives when approaching ethical issues as part of a health care team. Dr. Linda Beechinor and Dr. Susan Stefan share ethical challenges they face as nurse leaders.

Optional Resources
Fairchild, R. M. (2010). Practical ethical theory for nurses responding to complexity in care. Nursing Ethics, 17(3), 353–362.
Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.
Grimm, J. (2010). Effective leadership: Making the difference. JEN: Journal of Emergency Nursing, 36(1), 74–77.
Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.
________________________________________
Discussion: Ethics
As referenced in Week 2, Discussion 2, nurses are perceived as having very high ethical standards (Gallup, 2013). Doctorally prepared nurses should be able to consider ethical issues from multiple viewpoints. In this week’s media presentation, the experts discuss ethical challenges encountered by nurses as they assume leadership positions and as they engage in research.
To prepare:
• Reflect on ethical challenges that you have encountered in your nursing practice.
• Think about the information the experts shared in this week’s media presentation, focusing on the ethical challenges they have encountered as nurse leaders or scientists, as well as information presented in other Learning Resources.
• With this information in mind, consider what new ethical challenges you may face once you obtain your doctoral degree.
By Day 3
Post a cohesive response that addresses the following:
• Describe two or more significant ethical issues relevant to the DNP- or PhD-prepared nurse.
• Explain how these issues might compare to the types of issues you have already encountered in your practice.
Read a selection of your colleagues’ responses.
By Day 6
Respond to at least two of your colleagues in one or more of the following ways:
• Ask a probing question, substantiated with additional background information, evidence, or research.
• Share an insight from having read your colleagues’ postings, synthesizing the information to provide new perspectives.
• Offer and support an alternative perspective using readings from the classroom or from your own research in the Walden Library.
• Validate an idea with your own experience and additional research.
• Make a suggestion based on additional evidence drawn from readings or after synthesizing multiple postings.
• Expand on your colleagues’ postings by providing additional insights or contrasting perspectives based on readings and evidence.
Submission and Grading Information
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:
Week 5 Discussion Rubric

Post by Day 3 and Respond by Day 6

To participate in this Discussion:
Week 5 Discussion

________________________________________
Assignment: Becoming Familiar With the DNP Scholarly Project and PhD Dissertation
The Assignment that you began working on in Week 3 is due by Day 7 of this week.
Submission and Grading Information
To submit your completed Assignment for review and grading, do the following:
• Please save your Assignment using the naming convention “WK5Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” as the name.
• Click the Week 5 Assignment Rubric to review the Grading Criteria for the Assignment.
• Click the Week 5 Assignment link. You will also be able to “View Rubric” for grading criteria from this area.
• Next, from the Attach File area, click on the Browse My Computer button. Find the document you saved as “WK5Assgn+last name+first initial.(extension)” and click Open.
• If applicable: From the Plagiarism Tools area, click the checkbox for I agree to submit my paper(s) to the Global Reference Database.
• Click on the Submit button to complete your submission.
Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:
Week 5 Assignment Rubric

Check Your Assignment Draft for Authenticity

To check your Assignment draft for authenticity:
Submit your Week 5 Assignment draft and review the originality report.

Submit Your Assignment by Day 7 of Week 5

To submit your Assignment:
Week 5 Assignment

DNP 800 Week 5 Discussion Ethics
DNP 800 Week 5 Discussion Ethics

________________________________________
Week in Review
This week, you analyzed key ethical issues relevant to the doctorally prepared nurse and summarized required components of doctoral projects at Walden University.
In the final week, you will begin the extensive process of developing a DNP Scholarly Project by exploring problems in your own practice environment or developing a PhD Dissertation by identifying problems that you may wish to research.

To go to the next week:
Week 6
1 year ago
Courtney Jones
RE: Discussion – Week 5
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Ethics is defined as social obligations that encompass preserving the greater good of society (Silva & Ludwick, 2006). Entry-level nurses are taught the foundational nursing ethics of to include nonmaleficence, beneficence, autonomy, and justice. Silva & Ludwick (2006) suggests there is a social contract nurses enter into with society which gives nurses permission to practice with the understanding of commitment to the greater good of society. Incorporating nursing ethics is essential for nurses to utilize when implementing change or care, especially at the Doctor of Practice (DNP) level. There are so many ethical situations DNP-prepared nurses will face that are centered around health disparities, social determinants of health, cultural competency, and social justice, just to name a few. Peirce & Smith (2008) urges as the scope of practice expands for advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), so will ethical dilemmas.
DNP-prepared nurses will undoubtedly be placed in scenarios related to a patient making the decision to refuse treatment. DNP-prepared nurses understanding if a patient has adequate decision-making capacity, it is within his or her right to refuse care. Knowing, patients have the right to autonomy. DNP- prepared nurses will face the ethical dilemma of ensuring the greater good in society. Equally important, DNP-prepared nurses have the duty of increasing the knowledge of others. If DNP-prepared nurses educated his or her patient on all treatment options and the patient opt to not undergo treatment, the DNP nurse must come to terms that he or she has fulfilled their role to do no harm, as well as the commitment to the greater good of society. The scenario discussed above is all too familiar in my current everyday practice. As an APRN, I see patients on a daily who refused adjunct treatment to medication interventions. Specifically, my patient population with severe anxiety and depression. I encourage them to seek therapy in combination with medication management. I have a high percentage of patients who adamantly refuses therapy and opts only for medication interventions.
DNP-prepared nurses will, at some point, face the population of patients who are underinsured or not insured at all. How do DNP-prepared nurses ensure patients with healthcare disparities receive the essential services to promote the better good of society? DNP-prepared nurses must explore all community resources to help patients with health insurance disparities gain access to services needed. Currently, I know all too well the hardship patient with health insurance disparities face. As an APRN, I have patients tell me they can afford their medications. I always go the extra mile to explore indigent prescription programs, manufacture coupons, and prescription saving cards to help my patients get their medication. As a future DNP nurse, I will continue to explore all avenues to ensure the greater good of my patients and society.
Courtney
References
Peirce, A. G., & Smith, J. A. (2008). The ethics curriculum for Doctor of Nursing Practice programs. Journal of Professional Nursing, 24(5), 270-274.
Silva, M., Ludwick R., (March 20, 2006). “Ethics: Is the Doctor of Nursing Practice Ethical?” OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Vol. 11 No. 2

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1 year ago

RE: Discussion – Week 5
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Good point. Ethics are moral principles and social obligations that govern human behaviors. Often ethics arise when choices have to be made and the options available are not either clear or ideal. The choice picked could result in a decline in the quality of care offered to patients by nurses or can lead to a problematic clinical relationship. Nurses are obligated to preserve the greater good of society; however they encounter ethical challenges that compromise the provision of quality care in a healthcare setting (Ulrich et al., 2010). Nurses should practice with an understanding of commitment to the greater good of society. Therefore, they should adapt the several targeted related interventions that are useful in addressing the complex patient issues they encounter daily.
Reference
Ulrich, C. M., Taylor, C., Soeken, K., O’Donnell, P., Farrar, A., Danis, M., & Grady, C. (2010).
Everyday ethics: ethical issues and stress in nursing practice. Journal of advanced
nursing, 66(11), 2510-2519.

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1 year ago
RE: Discussion – Week 5
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As a nurse with many years working with those who have severe and persistent mental illness, it does not surprise me that many do not want to add therapy to their treatment plan. I am not sure if they are looking for a “quick fix” or do not believe in the merits of therapy, but I have seen the same thing you describe, over and over again. Thank you so much for sharing.
I really believe all nurses want to practice safely and ethically. I believe all new graduates enter the nursing profession with a good moral conscious and projects they will practice ethically. Then a new nurse gets hired and finds themselves working on floors that are understaffed for the level of acuity of the patients. Some leave to work at other places. Others continue to try to practice within the constraints they find themselves in. Other times, nurses cut corners, and tragically put patients at risk because they feel so overworked.
I often wonder how other nurses respond when they see nurses (both new grads or seasoned professionals) feel so overwhelmed by their workload that they omit doing things or cut corners in other ways. For example, when a nurse sees another nurse who does not report an error or skips the education part in a patient’s care due to time constraints, I wonder what happens. Do they normally report it, or at the very least confront the offending nurse? Are they fearful of the repercussions? Are they too stressed to care because they are on overload and do not have the resources needed? Do they see other nurses not practice ethically, and just follow their actions?
I am not sure what changes with time, but I have often seen a nurse become more cynical after practicing for a while. Any thoughts on why this happens?

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1 year ago
Courtney Jones
RE: Discussion – Week 5
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I believe workplace “Burnout” is a major factor in nurses becoming cynical over time. As you mentioned, there is a major shortage of nurses which, often, leads to nurses taking shortcuts to ” get the job done”. When nurses take shortcuts multiple times without a near sentinel event, using best practice is thrown to the wayside, in my opinion.

Courtney
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1 year ago
RE: Discussion – Week 5
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I enjoyed reading your discussion post, and it is highly informative. You are correct that patients who have severe anxiety and depression refuse to have combination therapy to help stabilize their conditions. How do you convince these patients who are adamant about having both treatments? I have worked with patients who are inflexible and are very time-consuming and frustrating. As a healthcare professional, we must focus on the cause, effect, behavioral pattern, attitudes, and deposition, providing appropriate outcome during your examination (Zaccagnini & Pechacek, 2021). There is much negative information that correlates with the feeling of burden and led to a high level of distress. We need to consider an appropriate approach in dealing with the moral dilemma at hand (Metselaar & Widdershoven, 2019). The principle of respect for autonomy is essential in providing full disclosure of relevant information to patients or health care personnel.
References
Metselaar, S., & Widdershoven, G. (2019). Moral dilemmas in (not) treating patients who feel they are a burden. Bioethics, 33(4), 431–438. https://doi-org.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/10.1111/bioe.12579
Zaccagnini, M. & Pechacek, J. M. (2021). The doctor of nursing practice essentials: A new model for advanced practice nursing (4th ed.).  Jones & Bartlett

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1 year ago
RE: Discussion – Week 5
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Hello Courtney,
Your post concur with my ideals especially in providing care to patients with health care disparities in our community. Most of the patients seen at our practice are the uninsured, those with low socio-economic factors, the homeless, and the impoverished. These minorities are unable to afford cost of medication and adhere to treatment regimen; impacting negatively on their health outcomes. This is an ethical issues we are confronted with as providers to ensure medications prescribed are taken. In order to ensure adherence, my health care practice have a program named Patient Assistance Medication (PAM), this program was made available through our Pharmaceutical department to help patient uninsured and without income pay for medications at a discounted rate. Access to health care is largely determined by family and community financial resources (Moy & Freeman, 2014). The goal is for DNP nurse leaders to work with administration to create an environment for safe, access, and quality patient care. As practitioners, we are educators to our patients and are obligated to provide resources to patients who have knowledge deficits on issues related to health care access to promote adherence.
Reference
Moy, E., & Freeman, W. (2014). Federal investments to eliminate racial/ethnic health-care disparities. Journal of Public Health. Retrieved from https://eds-b-ebscohost-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/eds/detail/detail?vid=1

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1 year ago
RE: Discussion – Week 5
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Hello Courtney,

Thank you for your great post! It is always best to be ethical in our practice as nurses. As we all are aware, true character is determined by what is done when no one is looking and not expecting anything in return. Nurses are frequently placed in unique positions to assist patients and families struggling with complex healthcare information and difficult decisions that can sometimes have negative comes (Silva & Ludwick 2006). Nurses encounter clinical situations daily that require ethical judgment that ensure the nursing staff to gain knowledge and expertise in delivering care in an ethical and safe manner.
Reference
Silva, M., & Ludwick, R. (2006). Ethics: Is the Doctor of Nursing Practice Ethical? OJIN: The Online
Journal of Issues in Nursing, 11(2).

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1 year ago
RE: Discussion – Week 5
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I really appreciated your post and I agree with you that ethical matters concern the greater good and the nursing profession (Silva & Ludwick, 2006). Cultural and social justice are important to educate and advocate from the beginning of one’s professional career in health care. This sector of business is heavily influenced by environmental and external variables. I believe this is one of the many reasons that practicing evidenced based medicine and performing nursing research are vital components to upholding an ethical integrity within the health care world. Underserved and impoverished communities are often the most challenging and rewarding populations to serve. In 2011, I was able to work in Port Au Prince, Haiti on a Medical Mission within tent cities, village towns and orphanages. During this time, I gained a magnitude of compassion and understanding for suffering and oppression. Along my nursing journey, I have sought these types of experiences to gain a deeper empathy for the world, humanity and myself. As I obtain new experiences and work towards a Doctoral degree in Nursing, I set forth with intentions of remaining open to the diverse ethical and social injustices which may exist.
Silva, M., Ludwick R., (March 20, 2006). “Ethics: Is the Doctor of Nursing Practice Ethical?” OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Vol. 11 No. 2

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11 months ago
RE: Discussion – Week 5
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Class,
Thinking of another ethical situation we can probably all relate to, I remember when pharmaceutical companies would visit my workplace and bring elaborate lunches and all sorts of free gifts—movie tickets, golfing, etc., trying to get the office to carry their products. It worked, too, until legislation was enacted in Michigan that prevented it. I think that nurses being asked by family members to give them medications is something I think goes on quite frequently, however.
Speaking of medications, another ethical thought I have been concerned about is how other venues like radio and television can indirectly precipitate ethical situations that healthcare professionals must deal with. For example, the effects of television commercials regarding the latest medications out in the market proves very effective to the targeted population. I came across many patients that after watching the television ads insist on being given the medication. Dr. Joan Stanley (Laureate 2012) verbalized that healthcare versus cost should be considered, along with what are the available resources, allotted funds, and reasonableness of a patient request before coming to a decision. Medications on television ranging from the diabetes, heart, pain, and testosterone supplements are the main issues nurses encounter. Any detailed explanation regarding the risk vs benefit, cost, safety, etc., proves effective to convey the message better than the television ads. According to a study conducted by Prosser, Almond, & Walley (2003), patient request for a new drug and patient acceptability were cited as contributing to decisions to prescribe a new drug in approximately 20% of cases, and these requests are often the result of patients watching colorful, convincing ads on television.

Ethical? Should we be using the media to target patients? Why are the side-effects or precautions often stated in a hurried, monotone voice tone that is difficult to understand and serve almost as an afterthought to the ad? Thoughts?

References
Hamric, A., Spross, J., & Hanson, C. (Eds.). (2005). Advanced practice nursing: An integrative approach (4th ed.). Saunders-Elsevier.
Prosser, H., Almond, S., & Walley, T. (2003). Influences on GP’s decision to prescribe new drugs: The importance of who says what. Family Practice, 20(1), 61–68.
Stanley, J., Stefan, S.,Beechinor, L. (2012). Ethical Issues Relevant to the DNP. Laureate Education video.

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DNP 800 Week 5 Discussion Ethics Grading Rubric Guidelines

Performance Category 10 9 8 4 0
Scholarliness

Demonstrates achievement of scholarly inquiry for professional and academic decisions.

  • Provides relevant evidence of scholarly inquiry clearly stating how the evidence informed or changed professional or academic decisions
  • Evaluates literature resources to develop a comprehensive analysis or synthesis.
  • Uses valid, relevant, and reliable outside sources to contribute to the threaded discussion
  • Provides relevant evidence of scholarly inquiry but does not clearly state how the evidence informed or changed professional or academic decisions.
  • Evaluates information from source(s) to develop a coherent analysis or synthesis.
  • Uses some valid, relevant, reliable outside sources to contribute to the threaded discussion.
  • Discusses using scholarly inquiry but does not state how scholarly inquiry informed or changed professional or academic decisions.
  • Information is taken from source(s) with some interpretation/evaluation, but not enough to develop a coherent analysis or synthesis.
  • Little valid, relevant, or reliable outside sources are used to contribute to the threaded discussion.
  • Demonstrates little or no understanding of the topic.
  • Discusses using scholarly inquiry but does not state how scholarly inquiry informed or changed professional or academic decisions.
  • Information is taken from source(s) without any interpretation/evaluation.
  • The posting uses information that is not valid, relevant, or reliable
  • No evidence of the use of scholarly inquiry to inform or change professional or academic decisions.
  • Information is not valid, relevant, or reliable
Performance Category  10 9 8 4 0
Application of Course Knowledge –

Demonstrate the ability to analyze, synthesize, and/or apply principles and concepts learned in the course lesson and outside readings and relate them to real-life professional situations

  • Posts make direct reference to concepts discussed in the lesson or drawn from relevant outside sources;
  • Applies concepts to personal experience in the professional setting and or relevant application to real life.
  • Posts make direct reference to concepts discussed in the lesson or drawn from relevant outside sources.
  • Applies concepts to personal experience in their professional setting and or relevant application to real life
  • Interactions with classmates are relevant to the discussion topic but do not make direct reference to lesson content
  • Posts are generally on topic but do not build knowledge by incorporating concepts and principles from the lesson.
  • Does not attempt to apply lesson concepts to personal experience in their professional setting and or relevant application to real life
  • Does not demonstrate a solid understanding of the principles and concepts presented in the lesson
  • Posts do not adequately address the question posed either by the discussion prompt or the instructor’s launch post.
  • Posts are superficial and do not reflect an understanding of the lesson content
  • Does not attempt to apply lesson concepts to personal experience in their professional setting and or relevant application to real life
  • Posts are not related to the topics provided by the discussion prompt or by the instructor; attempts by the instructor to redirect the student are ignored
  • No discussion of lesson concepts to personal experience in the professional setting and or relevant application to real life
Performance Category  5 4 3 2 0
Interactive Dialogue

Replies to each graded thread topic posted by the course instructor, by Wednesday, 11:59 p.m. MT, of each week, and posts a minimum of two times in each graded thread, on separate days.

(5 points possible per graded thread)

  • Exceeds minimum post requirements
  • Replies to each graded thread topic posted by the course instructor, by Wednesday, 11:59 p.m. MT, of each week, and posts three or more times in each graded thread, over three separate days.
  • Replies to a post posed by faculty and to a peer
  • Summarizes what was learned from the lesson, readings, and other student posts for the week.
  • Replies to each graded thread topic posted by the course instructor, by Wednesday, 11:59 p.m. MT, of each week, and posts a minimum of two times in each graded thread, on separate days
  • Replies to a question posed by a peer

Summarizes what was learned from the lesson, readings, and other student posts for the week.

  • Meets expectations of 2 posts on 2 different days.
  • The main post is not made by the Wednesday deadline
  • Does not reply to a question posed by a peer or faculty
  • Has only one post for the week
  • Discussion posts contain few, if any, new ideas or applications; often are a rehashing or summary of other students’ comments
  • Does not post to the thread
  • No connections are made to the topic
  Minus 1 Point Minus 2 Point Minus 3 Point Minus 4 Point Minus 5 Point
Grammar, Syntax, APA

Note: if there are only a few errors in these criteria, please note this for the student in as an area for improvement. If the student does not make the needed corrections in upcoming weeks, then points should be deducted.

Points deducted for improper grammar, syntax and APA style of writing.

The source of information is the APA Manual 6th Edition

  • 2-3 errors in APA format.
  • Written responses have 2-3 grammatical, spelling, and punctuation errors.
  • Writing style is generally clear, focused, and facilitates communication.
  • 4-5 errors in APA format.
  • Writing responses have 4-5 grammatical, spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Writing style is somewhat focused.
  • 6-7 errors in APA format.
  • Writing responses have 6-7 grammatical, spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Writing style is slightly focused making discussion difficult to understand.
  • 8-10 errors in APA format.
  • Writing responses have 8-10 grammatical, spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Writing style is not focused, making discussion difficult to understand.
  • Post contains greater than 10 errors in APA format.
  • Written responses have more than 10 grammatical, spelling and punctuation errors.
  • Writing style does not facilitate communication.
  • The student continues to make repeated mistakes in any of the above areas after written correction by the instructor
0 points lost       -5 points lost
Total Participation Requirements

per discussion thread

The student answers the threaded discussion question or topic on one day and posts a second response on another day. The student does not meet the minimum requirement of two postings on two different days
Early Participation Requirement

per discussion thread

The student must provide a substantive answer to the graded discussion question(s) or topic(s), posted by the course instructor (not a response to a peer), by Wednesday, 11:59 p.m. MT of each week. The student does not meet the requirement of a substantive response to the stated question or topic by Wednesday at 11:59 pm MT.

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