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Discussion: The Application of Data to Problem-Solving NURS 6051

Discussion: The Application of Data to Problem-Solving NURS 6051

 

RE: Discussion – Week 1

Initial Post

As of November 30th, 2020, the Florida Health Department states that there are a total of 999,913 positive cases, and there are 54,864 residents with COVID that are currently hospitalized (Florida’s COVID-19 Data and Surveillance Dashboard, n.d.). Out of these statistics, the median age of these cases is 40, however, the majority of the hospitalizations with COVID complications come from the age bracket of 65-74 years old, with an approximate 20% of hospitalizations (COVID-19 Summary for Florida, n.d.), compared to the 8% that the 35-44-year-old bracket comprises of (COVID-19 Summary for Florida, n.d.). As an ER nurse, I spend many shifts working in the “mitigation” area, which is where my hospital places patients with any COVID, flu-like or respiratory symptoms. Many times, the patients are stable enough to be swabbed and discharged as they await their results via telephone, (unless we swab them with the rapid tests that are designed for admission purposes, but the provider can decide which is best). When the patient is stable enough to be discharged, they are oftentimes discharged with a home monitoring kit that includes a pulse oximetry as well as a thermometer. During the discharge education, I help the patients understand how to read the pulse oximetry and encourage them to take their O2 saturation levels several times a day to ensure there are no drastic changes.

When they are discharged with this kit, we also educate the patient on a specific app that is downloaded on their mobile device, and they can log their vital signs as well as speak to a healthcare member that can advise them on any changes. In a study conducted by (Shah et al., 2020), it is noted that COVID-19 has been considered to, in some cases, induce “silent hypoxia”, in which the O2 sats drop below 92% on room air without any other symptoms. Having this tool can be a tremendous benefit to patients that are discharged with COVID symptoms. The devices themselves are easy  to use, and people of all ages can easily grasp the concept. The patients are also educated on what symptoms require immediate medical attention. Discussion: The Application of Data to Problem-Solving NURS 6051

However, when it comes to explaining the home monitoring application that needs to be downloaded into their smartphones for

Discussion The Application of Data to Problem-Solving NURS 6051

Discussion The Application of Data to Problem-Solving NURS 6051

appropriate vital sign documentation, and other benefits, the older demographic is usually left confused or unable to participate (due to lack of smartphone, etc). In many cases, patients in this demographic with COVID symptoms or that are known positives, will return to the ED because they feel as if they don’t have any other option and don’t understand why they are not “feeling better”.  Although this may sometimes be the better alternative, it is possible that if the patient had the technological resources, they could’ve avoided a visit to the ER and increase the chances of compromising themselves or others.

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(Czaja, 2019) mentions in an article that by the year 2030, over 20% percent of the U.S. population is expected to be over the age of 65, with technological advances increasing as well. In the same article, (Czaja, 2019) also points out the benefits of technology assisting in-home health status checks, as well as a great way to monitor patients from home. Due to all of these combined benefits, my proposal would be to discharge these patients that are elderly, who don’t own a smartphone or don’t understand how to use it, with a pre-set mobile device that is easy to function in yet is able to help the patient document their O2 sats. The device will only be able to document oxygen levels, receive calls from the home monitoring personal or call out to them. The colors on the preset app. that will automatically load will be represented as Green= 100%-96% Yellow= 95%-92% Red= 92% or lower. It won’t be complicated for the patient to use,  yet can help the patient get the attention that they need from home, with the possibility of avoiding a hospital visit.

The nurse leader can use the data collected from the home monitoring company from these devices to analyze how efficient this system will work for this age group on a weekly basis. In the EHR, the staff nurses will document on their discharge portion that the patient was sent home with this specific device so an exact count will be noted. If the patient returns to the hospital for the same symptoms, it can be due to the effectiveness of the device, or a lack of education. Either way, gathering this data can be beneficial in helping to reduce the number of unnecessary visits to the ER, or on the contrary, can help the patient before it gets worse. As more COVID cases emerge in the state of Florida, where a large portion of the population is over 65%, a device such as this can be instrumental in helping those that are most vulnerable but don’t work well with modern technology.

References

COVID-19 Summary for Florida. (n.d.). Florida Department of Health, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection. Retrieved December 1, 2020, from http://ww11.doh.state.fl.us/comm/_partners/covid19_report_archive/cases-monitoring-and-pui-information/county-report/county_reports_latest.pdf

Czaja, S. J. (2019). Usability of technology for older adults: Where are we and where do we need to be. Journal of Usability Studies, 14(2), 61–64. https://eds-a-ebscohost-com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=1&sid=4ca1b86e-2878-403e-b2bb-560ef0ae8e1b%40sdc-v-sessmgr01

Florida’s COVID-19 data and surveillance dashboard. (n.d.). Florida Department of Health, Division of Disease Control and Health Protection. Retrieved November 30, 2020, from https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/96dd742462124fa0b38ddedb9b25e429

Shah, S., Majmudar, K., Stein, A., Gupta, N., Suppes, S., Karamanis, M., Capannari, J., Sethi, S., & Patte, C. (2020). Novel use of home pulse oximeter monitoring in COVID-19 patients discharged from the emergency department identifies need for hospitalization. Society for Academic Emergency Medicine, 681–692. https://doi.org/10.1111/acem.14053

RE: Discussion – Week 1

Response # 1 Natalyl Bernal

Natalyl,

Thank you for this informative post. It is nice to know that they have these kits available for patients to continuously monitor themselves at home. In this technology filled era in which we now live, healthcare providers need to be vigilant and engage directly with the patients especially when giving discharge instructions or teaching (Laureate Education, 2018). The nurses who complete the discharge instructions really have a vital role in the implementation of this data collection with the home kits.

I think that your pre-set device would be a great idea especially for the elderly. As healthcare professionals, we continuously receive and analyze data to become more proactive and provide the best possible care for their patients (McGoningle & Mastrian, 2017). An analysis of the acquired data from your device could serve a catalyst for additional changes in home monitoring during this pandemic. For example, your device could be remotely linked to a database (like remote telemetry monitoring) where a healthcare professional is assigned to monitor the uploaded data. That healthcare worker would then be able to call and check in on the elderly or alert emergency responders if the oxygen level becomes dangerously low. Discussion: The Application of Data to Problem-Solving NURS 6051

Laureate Education (Producer). (2018). Health Informatics and Population Health: Trends in Population Health [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. G. (2017). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Chapter 2, “Introduction to Information, Information Science, and Information Systems” (p. 30)

Response 1 Nataly Bernal

            When I was researching my own scenario for this discussion, I came across Big Data examples and decreasing avoidable ER visits was on the list (Durcevic, 2019). In the article pertaining to the ER, a program was created in California called PreManage ED (Durcevic, 2019). The program helps other facilities to be able to access a patient’s chart who was treated at another neighboring facility (Durcevic, 2019). This helped the county decrease time, resources, and cost to patients who were chronic ER patients (Durcevic, 2019).

That is very awesome that your hospital provides COVID patients, who are discharged home to manage symptoms, an at-home monitoring kit and a smartphone application to track their data. As far as I know, the hospital I work for in Michigan doesn’t do this. The only app I know of that the state government has spoken of is Mi COVID Alert (Michigan.gov, 2020). This app is for contact tracing only, not for tracking symptoms (Michigan.gov, 2020). Is this app only available to your hospital or the state of Florida?

Reference

Durcevic, S. (2019). 18 Examples Of Big Data Analytics In Healthcare That Can Save People. Datapine. https://www.datapine.com/blog/big-data-examples-in-healthcare/

Michigan.gov. (2020). How the app works. SOM – State of Michigan. https://www.michigan.gov/coronavirus/0,9753,7-406-99891_102592_102594—,00.html

Discussion: The Application of Data to Problem-Solving

In the modern era, there are few professions that do not to some extent rely on data. Stockbrokers rely on market data to advise clients on financial matters. Meteorologists rely on weather data to forecast weather conditions, while realtors rely on data to advise on the purchase and sale of property. In these and other cases, data not only helps solve problems, but adds to the practitioner’s and the discipline’s body of knowledge.

Of course, the nursing profession also relies heavily on data. The field of nursing informatics aims to make sure nurses have access to the appropriate date to solve healthcare problems, make decisions in the interest of patients, and add to knowledge.

In this Discussion, you will consider a scenario that would benefit from access to data and how such access could facilitate both problem-solving and knowledge formation.

To Prepare:

  • Reflect on the concepts of informatics and knowledge work as presented in the Resources.
  • Consider a hypothetical scenario based on your own healthcare practice or organization that would require or benefit from the access/collection and application of data. Your scenario may involve a patient, staff, or management problem or gap.

By Day 3 of Week 1

Post a description of the focus of your scenario. Describe the data that could be used and how the data might be collected and accessed. What knowledge might be derived from that data? How would a nurse leader use clinical reasoning and judgment in the formation of knowledge from this experience?

By Day 6 of Week 1

Respond to at least two of your colleagues* on two different days, asking questions to help clarify the scenario and application of data, or offering additional/alternative ideas for the application of nursing informatics principles.

*Note: Throughout this program, your fellow students are referred to as colleagues.

Submission and Grading Information

Grading Criteria

To access your rubric:

Week 1 Discussion Rubric

Post by Day 3 and Respond by Day 6 of Week 1

To participate in this Discussion:

Week 1 Discussion

Rubric Detail

Select Grid View or List View to change the rubric’s layout.
Content
Name: NURS_5051_Module01_Week01_Discussion_Rubric

Grid View
List View

Excellent Good Fair Poor
Main Posting
Points Range: 45 (45%) – 50 (50%)
Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources.

Supported by at least three current, credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 40 (40%) – 44 (44%)
Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth.

Supported by at least three credible sources.

Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 35 (35%) – 39 (39%)
Responds to some of the discussion question(s).

One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed.

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Post is cited with two credible sources.

Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Contains some APA formatting errors.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 34 (34%)
Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately.

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria.

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis.

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module.

Contains only one or no credible sources.

Not written clearly or concisely.

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors.

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.
Main Post: Timeliness
Points Range: 10 (10%) – 10 (10%)
Posts main post by day 3.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not post by day 3.
First Response
Points Range: 17 (17%) – 18 (18%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 15 (15%) – 16 (16%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 13 (13%) – 14 (14%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 12 (12%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Second Response
Points Range: 16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings.

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources.

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings.

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 12 (12%) – 13 (13%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth.

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 11 (11%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth.

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication.

Responses to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.
Participation
Points Range: 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days.
Total Points: 100
Name: NURS_5051_Module01_Week01_Discussion_Rubric

Healthcare technology is essential in patient care. As healthcare professionals, we must always be ready to embrace change. Nurses must be aware of available healthcare technology for problem-solving skills, which will help improve patient care. Nursing informatics integrates nursing science with information technology to identify, analyze and communicate healthcare data (Kassam et al., 2017). Easy access to medical records is essential in the provision of quality healthcare services. Utilization and application of knowledge from healthcare foundation is the basis of nursing science (McGonigle & Mastrian, 2021).

One scenario that I would use informatics is in immunizations. In my current place of work, I work with parents and healthcare providers on vaccination records for patients. A problem arises when families have to relocate to other states without their vaccination records. These parents are not sure whether their children have been vaccinated, and they must the previous state immunization registries. It would thus be essential to have a centralized immunization registry. This system will track the vaccine given to patients and the due dates for the vaccines. Healthcare providers can thus access patient vaccination records and use them to make clinical decisions.

There is a lot of knowledge that can come from this data. Healthcare professionals can determine vaccination rates and map out areas of potential outbreaks. Nurse leaders are critical in ensuring the quality and safety of healthcare services (Goh, Ang & Della, 2018). Nurse leaders can utilize judgment and clinical reasoning with knowledge from this data to discuss reasons for the low uptake of immunization. This can help them to develop policies to ensure that patients and communities are educated on the benefits of vaccinations. Nurse leaders can also be aware of contraindications of vaccines for specific patients by having access to the central database. A centralized vaccine database is beneficial not only to the patient but also to the healthcare professionals. Patients will receive vaccines that will help them, and healthcare professionals will have an efficient vaccination system.

Name: NURS_5051_Module01_Week01_Discussion_Rubric

Excellent Good Fair Poor
Main Posting
Points Range: 45 (45%) – 50 (50%)
Answers all parts of the discussion question(s) expectations with reflective critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module and current credible sources. 

Supported by at least three current, credible sources. 

Written clearly and concisely with no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 40 (40%) – 44 (44%)
Responds to the discussion question(s) and is reflective with critical analysis and synthesis of knowledge gained from the course readings for the module. 

At least 75% of post has exceptional depth and breadth. 

Supported by at least three credible sources. 

Written clearly and concisely with one or no grammatical or spelling errors and fully adheres to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Points Range: 35 (35%) – 39 (39%)
Responds to some of the discussion question(s). 

One or two criteria are not addressed or are superficially addressed. 

Is somewhat lacking reflection and critical analysis and synthesis. 

Somewhat represents knowledge gained from the course readings for the module. 

Post is cited with two credible sources. 

Written somewhat concisely; may contain more than two spelling or grammatical errors. 

Contains some APA formatting errors.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 34 (34%)
Does not respond to the discussion question(s) adequately. 

Lacks depth or superficially addresses criteria. 

Lacks reflection and critical analysis and synthesis. 

Does not represent knowledge gained from the course readings for the module. 

Contains only one or no credible sources. 

Not written clearly or concisely. 

Contains more than two spelling or grammatical errors. 

Does not adhere to current APA manual writing rules and style.

Main Post: Timeliness
Points Range: 10 (10%) – 10 (10%)
Posts main post by day 3.
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not post by day 3.
First Response
Points Range: 17 (17%) – 18 (18%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings. 

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty. 

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources. 

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives. 

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. 

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed. 

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 15 (15%) – 16 (16%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings. 

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. 

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed. 

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources. 

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 13 (13%) – 14 (14%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth. 

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication. 

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed. 

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 12 (12%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth. 

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication. 

Responses to faculty questions are missing. 

No credible sources are cited.

Second Response
Points Range: 16 (16%) – 17 (17%)
Response exhibits synthesis, critical thinking, and application to practice settings. 

Responds fully to questions posed by faculty. 

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by at least two scholarly sources. 

Demonstrates synthesis and understanding of learning objectives. 

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. 

Responses to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed. 

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 14 (14%) – 15 (15%)
Response exhibits critical thinking and application to practice settings. 

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues. 

Responses to faculty questions are answered, if posed. 

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources. 

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

Points Range: 12 (12%) – 13 (13%)
Response is on topic and may have some depth. 

Responses posted in the discussion may lack effective professional communication. 

Responses to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed. 

Response may lack clear, concise opinions and ideas, and a few or no credible sources are cited.

Points Range: 0 (0%) – 11 (11%)
Response may not be on topic and lacks depth. 

Responses posted in the discussion lack effective professional communication. 

Responses to faculty questions are missing. 

No credible sources are cited.

Participation
Points Range: 5 (5%) – 5 (5%)
Meets requirements for participation by posting on three different days.
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Points Range: 0 (0%) – 0 (0%)
Does not meet requirements for participation by posting on 3 different days.
Total Points: 100
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