Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

  • Determine the methods used to evaluate the need for the change
  • Display the approach and criteria for choosing individuals or teams necessary for the change initiative
  • Determine the strategies of communication
  • Determine the strategies to gather stakeholder support and overcome resistance
  • Outline the implementation strategies
  • Outline the sustainability strategies

Six Foundations of Steering Change Initiative

  • Methods of evaluating the need for change:
  • Come up with a diverse focus group that is capable of giving essential feedback regarding the necessary change that is needed in improving the behavior and accountability of students within the city (Swantner, 2016).
  • Collect the feedback from the developed focus group
  • Align the needs of the focus group to the vision of the implementation of Leader in Me change initiative
  • Confirm the ways in which their concerns can align with the implementation of Leader in Me.

Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

The University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) facility prides itself in being a premier institution of care. The application of evidence-based practice in several of its units has made it improve on its provision of services. However, the human aspect of the hospital has demonstrated certain weaknesses that the leadership should address. An analysis of the UTMB reveals that the ratio nurses to patients goes beyond the recommended level of 1: 6. The analysis further revealed that the high nurse to patient

ratio exists due to a high turnover rate at the facility. As such, addressing the turnover rate will play an important role in ensuring that the ratio aligns with the recommendation of the American Nurses Association of 1:6. The present paper will thus focus on the implementation, evaluation and sustainability of the nurse turnover change initiative at the UTMB medical-surgical unit.

The Need for Change

Nurse turnover has created a rapidly growing human resource issue in the contemporary healthcare sphere. Hospital managers have stated that nurse turnovers have certain consequences since it leads to the disruption of hospital service operations (Tang & Hudson, 2019). The UMTB has suffered the consequence of high nurse turnover as demonstrated by its high nurse to patient ratio at the medical-surgical unit. As a consequence of high turnover rate at the medical-surgical unit, it experiences a high risk-adjusted mortality. Moreover, the medical-surgical unit also experiences higher lengths of stay at the unit compared to other units. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

The presence of high turnover rates at the medical surgical unit of UMTB has also increased the cost of care for an individual patient. Due to the extended length of stay at the unit, the amount of money spent on individual patients have increased remarkably since the medical-surgical unit started registering increased nurse turnover. Suggestive evidence shows that high turnover rate at the unit has increased its operational costs (Tucker et al., 2019). An analysis shows that cost of hiring and training new nurses for the medical-surgical unit has skyrocketed since its nurses started leaving. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

The loss of nurses for the medical-surgical unit has also led to staffing problems for the unit. Consequently, the unit suffers the loss the trained and experienced nurses, an imbalanced composition of remaining and new nurses and nurse shortages (Tang & Hudson, 2019). The staffing problems have resulted in challenges in arranging work and formulating schedules for nurse managers.  As a result, the situation necessitates increased overtime for remaining nurses. The resultant effects of nurse turnover cause reduced morale amongst the nurses at the unit, which negatively impacts most parameters of healthcare quality. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

Driving Forces

Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability
Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

            The driving forces for nurse turnover entails multifactorial factors in the form of economic, social and political aspects. The medical-surgical unit at UMTB suffers from factors such as absence of support from the nurse leadership. Organizational variables such as the lack of leadership play significant roles in the presence of nurse turnover (Scruth, Garcia, & Buchner, 2018). The nurse leadership at the medical-surgical unit of UMTB lacks the requisite skills to motivate the nurses hence their high turnover rates. Moreover, the high nurse-to-patient ratio results increased workload for the nurses. The overworking of nurses through strategies such as forced overtime makes them susceptible to burnout, which exacerbates the turnover rate issue.

The limited growth opportunities at the unit also leads to nurses quitting in pursuit of places where they abound for them. External factors such as the local labor economy does not favor the hospital hence the high rates of turnover. Moreover, State of Texas does not have a law guiding on the number of nurses per patients, which makes hospitals try to save money by keeping the ratio high (Cimiotti et al., 2019). Also, the presence of high competition from other healthcare players has accelerated the rate at which UMTB medical-surgical unit loses nurses. An analysis of the healthcare environment reveals that the competitors perhaps have better policies and offer more incentives, which attracts the medical-surgical nurses from UMTB. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

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The presence of a high turnover rate will have a direct impact of the remaining nurses and the patients. The remaining nurses have to work twofold and sometimes threefold due to understaffing. These nurses also have to persevere with forced overtime, which leads to other issues such as burnout (Scruth, Garcia, & Buchner, 2018). On the other hand, the patients suffer since the quality of services offered have reduced. The impact of nurse turnover on quality parameters has in turn negatively affected patient satisfaction with the services offered at the medical-surgical unit at UMTB. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

Stakeholder Evaluation

            The proposed change for the issue of nurse turnover entails a multifactorial approach including inculcating the organizational culture during hiring, providing effective communication of organizational goals during the same period, and offering opportunities for growth through courses that improve competence. The nurse managers will take a frontline approach in the change initiative. During this period, nurse managers will need to change their approach in terms of communicating the unit’s goals, objectives and culture to the new nurses to make them feel part of the team (Hughes, 2017). Moreover, the new nurses at the facility will greatly benefit from the change initiative since they will find a new culture of doing things at the facility, which will persuade them to stay longer. The veteran nurses will also benefit from the change initiative since their workload will reduce and the facility will give them increased opportunity to grow at the facility.

The Role of Nurse Leader in the Change Initiative

            Nurse leaders act as change agents to implement changes that will enhance nursing and improve the working conditions of floor nurses. In the present change initiative, the nurse leaders will play a fundamental role in implementing improved interpersonal relationships with new nurses during interviews and orientation. Moreover, the nurse leaders will ensure the formulation effective communication concerning the reorganization of the growth opportunities for existing nurses and how they align with organizational objectives (Nelson‐Brantley & Ford, 2017). In order to ensure that nurses remain with the facility for a long time, nurse leaders will explain to them the need to observe organizational culture and how the change initiative will impact the nurses going forward. In other words, nurse leaders will ensure the implementation of the various facets of the change initiative.

The Lippit’s seven step change theory will play an instrumental role in the change initiative at the UMTB medical-surgical unit. Using this theory, the present author will diagnose the issue of nurse burnout and evaluate the capability and motivation for change. Moreover, the author will assess the motivation of the change agent and available resources as well as elect progressive change objectives. Further, explaining the role of the change agent to the employees by ensuring clarity in their expectation and sustaining the change through feedback, effective communication and coordination regarding the effects of the change will occur (Burke, 2017). Lastly, the Lippit’s seven step change theory will allow the author to terminate the helping association of the change agent gradually. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

Change Agents and their Roles

            Change agents play crucial roles in managing the change process. As such, the identification of these change agents and clearly outlining their roles becomes an important facet of a change initiative. In the present project, the chief financial officer, as part of the management, will need to support the project. Their role will entail providing resources for the project by convincing the management of the business essence of the change initiative (Jones-Schenk, 2017). Further, a quality improvement adviser will need to participate in the project and their main role will entail convincing the administrative leadership of the impact of the project on quality parameters.

Moreover, the nurse manager will work as a change advocate for the project. The role of the nurse manager as a change advocate will entail showing commitment to the objectives of the project and then influence others to become active (Kodama & Fukahori, 2017). The author will also identify a nurse from the remaining nurses to also act as a change advocate. The role of the nurse will entail convincing other nurses of the essence of the project and communicating the leadership’s objective to them.

Application of the Change Theory to Develop Strategies

            The change initiative related to the reduction of nurse turnover rates will occur based on Lewin’s Change Model. The adoption of the change model occurs due to its premise that seeks to influence organizational behavior (Shani & Noumair, 2017). The model will facilitate the acquisition of driving forces that will push the UMTB employees at the medical-surgical unit towards the desired direction by the unit’s leadership. Moreover, the theory will enable the leadership of the unit to determine the potency of the forces leading to a high nurse turnover and prescribe the requisite intervention to halt the same.

The first step of the model entails unfreezing, which encompasses altering the existing behavior so as to achieve equilibrium, conformity, and overcome resistance. During the phase, the unit leadership and change agents will undertake an examination of internal and external factors to support the need for change. Regarding internal factors, parameters such as nurse burnout, enhanced readmission rates, failing quality indicators, and high levels of mortality will convince the leadership of the need to have the change initiative and recruit change advocates from amongst them (Halter et al., 2017), Similarly, the management will need convincing using external parameters such as failing patronage, reduced patient satisfaction statistics, and failing revenues. The presence of information concerning the need for change will lead to the identification of a team that will oversee the improvement of interpersonal relationship through effective communication and other stratagem to improve change within the medical-surgical unit at UMTB. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

The second phase of the change initiative based on Lewin’s model entails the change process. During this phase the change, the presence of effective communication strategies will play a significant role in institution change. The nurse leadership at the unit will adopt an informal communication strategy so as to take advantage of informal social dependencies, paths, and connections to improve interprofessional relationships between leadership and nurses at the medical-surgical unit (Zbieg, Batorski, & Żak, 2016). However, a form of formal communication known as the cascade strategy will also occur wherein nurse managers will train nurse leaders, who will in turn train the nurse advocates, who will pass the information to their peers. The unfreezing process will entail the implementation of the change initiative wherein proper interpersonal relationships starting with interviews will occur.

Overcoming Barriers to Change

            The success of the change initiative will depend on the stakeholder support that will exist from the leadership and personnel of the organization. Potential barriers may include lack of support from the leadership and limited financial resources from the administration. Moreover, ineffective communication could also hamper the initiative. To address the challenges, the advocates of change initiatives will lobby for enough funding while they will use data to convince the administration of the necessity for the project (Clayton, 2019). Moreover, formulation of an effective communication strategy to communicate the objectives of the initiative to the leadership and outline the roles of various change agents will overcome the barriers. Monitoring the implementation process will allow the change team wo address unforeseen circumstances and address it in timely fashion and intelligently.

Evaluation Methods

            The evaluation methods of the change initiative will focus on the quality parameters and the improvement of the wellbeing of nurses. One of the most significant determinants of the success of the project will entail a reduction of the mortality rates, improved patient satisfaction, and the cost of care per patient.  Moreover, other parameters such as the financial position of the unit, the rate of turnover and the nurse to patient ratio after the implementation of the initiative will also demonstrate the effectiveness of the project (Nelson‐Brantley & Ford, 2017). The evaluation of the change initiative will occur based on comparative data before the change initiative and after the implementation of the same. The analysis of the data will reveal whether the project will have succeeded or not based on individual parameters. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

Strategies for Sustaining Change

            To sustain change, identification of the threats to the project will become foundational and it will occur using the The National Health Service Sustainability Model. Afterwards, the UTMB will adopt the usage of tools such as such as process control boards, performance board, improvement hurdles, as well as standard work to guarantee change sustainability. Whereas process control and performance board will help the change agents to review the project to the leadership, the standard work will visually communicate to the nurses the best practices supported by the organization as a result of the change initiative (Silver et al., 2016). The improvement hurdles will assess the project through meetings between the leadership and the nurses, which facilitates the improvement of interpersonal relationships.

Overall Effectiveness of Change Plan

            The mission statement of the UTMB entails the provision of highest quality patient care. The fact that reduced turnover of nurses will improve quality parameters implies that the change initiative aligns with the mission statement of the facility and its goals. The change initiatives address stakeholder concerns by ensuring that the hospital’s patronage will improve, patient satisfaction will increase and other quality parameters of the facility will also improve. As relates to the community, the improvement of services through improving the nurse to patient ratio will ensure that the people of Texas benefit from quality healthcare as promised by the facility.

References

Burke, W. W. (2017). Organization Change: Theory and Practice. Thousand Oaks, CA : SAGE Publications

Cimiotti, J. P., Li, Y., Sloane, D. M., Barnes, H., Brom, H. M., & Aiken, L. H. (2019). Regulation of the nurse practitioner workforce: Implications for care across settings. Journal of Nursing Regulation, 10(2), 31-37.

Clayton, W. R. (2019). Overcoming barriers impeding nurse activation of rapid response teams. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 24(3).

Halter, M., Pelone, F., Boiko, O., Beighton, C., Harris, R., Gale, J., … & Drennan, V. (2017). Interventions to reduce adult nursing turnover: A systematic review of systematic reviews. The open nursing journal, 11, 108.

Hughes, V. (2017). Leadership strategies to promote nurse retention. Sci J Nurs Pract, 1(1), 1-5.

Jones-Schenk, J. (2017). Fostering personal power during change. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 48(8), 343-344.

Kodama, Y., & Fukahori, H. (2017). Nurse managers’ attributes to promote change in their wards: A qualitative study. Nursing open, 4(4), 209-217.

Nelson‐Brantley, H. V., & Ford, D. J. (2017). Leading change: a concept analysis. Journal of advanced nursing, 73(4), 834-846.

Scruth, E. A., Garcia, S., & Buchner, L. (2018). Work life quality, healthy work environments, and nurse retention. Clinical Nurse Specialist, 32(3), 111-113.

Shani, A. B., & Noumair, D. A. (2017). Research in organizational change and development: Volume 25. Bingley, UK: Emerald Publishing Limited.

Silver, S. A., McQuillan, R., Harel, Z., Weizman, A. V., Thomas, A., Nesrallah, G., … & Chertow, G. M. (2016). How to sustain change and support continuous quality improvement. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 11(5), 916-924.

Tang, J. H., & Hudson, P. (2019). Evidence-based practice guideline: Nurse retention for nurse managers. Journal of gerontological nursing, 45(11), 11-19.

Tucker, S. J., Gallagher-Ford, L., Baker, M., & Vottero, B. A. (2019). Promoting nurse retention through career development planning. Ajn, American Journal of Nursing, 119(6), 62-66.

Zbieg, A., Batorski, D., & Żak, B. (2016). How to select change agents in organizations? A comparison of the classical and network approaches. Problemy Zarządzania, (4/2016 (64), t. 2), 120-143.

LDR 615 Benchmark Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

You will utilize your change model for this assignment. Review the feedback submitted by your instructor on your previous change model assignment. The change model that was used in the previous submission was Lewin\’s model. Make any changes or modifications necessary for the submission of this assignment.

Evaluate the performance of your organization or department. Identify an area that would significantly benefit from initiating a change. Write a paper (1,500-1,750 words) in which you describe the particular area you propose to address through a change initiative. Include the following for your company:

Discuss the issues in this area and the current outcomes as a result of the issues.
Describe the external and/or internal driving forces, contributing issues, and the people affected.
Evaluate the stakeholders involved and discuss how they will be affected by your change initiative.
Clarify your role and responsibility as a change leader. Discuss the leadership theory (or theories) you will use to guide the change process.
Discuss the change agents you need to recruit in order to successfully implement your change. Describe the roles of these change agents.
Utilize your change model to develop strategies: (a) Explain the relevance of this model to your organization; and (b) Present the strategic aspects using your model. Be sure to clearly define the purpose of each aspect, the people involved, and the actions that need to be taken.
Identify, or predict, the potential barriers to change. Discuss possible ways to overcome these obstacles, including methods for dealing with emerging or unforeseen circumstances that could impede implementation.
Describe the evaluation methods you will use to determine the level of success of your change initiative. Discuss what metrics or measureable determinates you will use.
Propose strategies to anchor change or support continuous change.
Establish how your change plan supports the organizational mission/goal, genuinely addresses stakeholder concerns, and will serve as an equitable contribution for the community or society overall. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

I currently work in Baptist Hospital in maternal-child area.

Resources

The Heart of Change: Real-Life Stories of How People Change Their Organizations

Read the Introduction and Chapter/Step 5 in The Heart of Change: Real-Life Stories of How People Change Their Organizations

… 


Transformational Change


Integrating Organizational Change Management and Customer Relationship Management in a Casino

Read “Integrating Organizational Change Management and Customer Relationship Management in a Casino,” by Chi Cong Mai, Perry, and

… 


Evaluating the Success of Strategic Change Against Kotter’s Eight Steps

Read “Evaluating the Success of Strategic Change Against Kotter’s Eight Steps,” by Spencer and Winn, from Planning for Higher

… 


Team-Building and Change Management in Respiratory Care: Description of a Process and Outcomes

Read “Team-Building and Change Management in Respiratory Care: Description of a Process and Outcomes,” by Stoller et al., from

… 


Mastering the Art of Change


The Meaning and Measurement of Implementation Climate

Read “The Meaning and Measurement of Implementation Climate,” by Weiner et al., from Implementation Science (2011).

… 

Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability – Rubric

The Need for Change

25 points

Criteria Description

The Need for Change

5. Excellent

25 points

The need for change including specifying the issue and the current outcomes resulting from the issue is discussed, including all necessary elements.

4. Good

21.75 points

The need for change including specifying the issue and the current outcomes resulting from the issue is thoroughly discussed with rich detail, including all necessary elements.

3. Satisfactory

19.75 points

The need for change including specifying the issue and the current outcomes resulting from the issue is included, but discussion is cursory and lacking in depth.

2. Less than Satisfactory

18.5 points

The need for change including specifying the issue and the current outcomes resulting from the issue is discussed, but discussion is incomplete or inaccurate.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

The need for change including specifying the issue and the current outcomes resulting from the issue is not discussed.

Driving Forces

12.5 points

Criteria Description

Driving Forces

5. Excellent

12.5 points

Description of internal and/or external driving forces, contributing issues, and people affected is included, but discussion is cursory and lacking in depth. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

4. Good

10.88 points

Description of internal and/or external driving forces, contributing issues, and people affected is discussed, including all necessary elements.

3. Satisfactory

9.88 points

Description of internal and/or external driving forces, contributing issues, and people affected is thoroughly discussed with rich detail, including all necessary elements.

2. Less than Satisfactory

9.25 points

Description of internal and/or external driving forces, contributing issues, and people affected is incomplete or inaccurate.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Description of internal and/or external driving forces, contributing issues, and people affected is not included.

Stakeholder Evaluation

12.5 points

Criteria Description

Stakeholder Evaluation

5. Excellent

12.5 points

Evaluation of stakeholders and how they will be affected by the change initiative is thoroughly discussed with rich detail, including all necessary elements. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

4. Good

10.88 points

Evaluation of stakeholders and how they will be affected by the change initiative is incomplete or inaccurate.

3. Satisfactory

9.88 points

Evaluation of stakeholders and how they will be affected by the change initiative is discussed, including all necessary elements.

2. Less than Satisfactory

9.25 points

Evaluation of stakeholders and how they will be affected by the change initiative is not included.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Evaluation of stakeholders and how they will be affected by the change initiative is included, but discussion is cursory and lacking in depth.

The Role of the Leader in the Change Initiative

25 points

Criteria Description

The Role of the Leader in the Change Initiative

5. Excellent

25 points

The role of the leader in the change initiative is thoroughly presented with rich detail and includes discussion of all necessary elements.

4. Good

21.75 points

The role of the leader in the change initiative is presented and includes discussion of all necessary elements.

3. Satisfactory

19.75 points

The role of the leader in the change initiative is present, but it is incomplete or inaccurate.

2. Less than Satisfactory

18.5 points

The role of the leader in the change initiative is presented, but it is cursory and lacking in depth.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

The role of the leader in the change initiative is not addressed.

Change Agents and Roles

25 points

Criteria Description

Change Agents and Roles

5. Excellent

25 points

Discussion of necessary change agents and their respective roles in implementing change is thoroughly discussed with rich detail, including all necessary elements. Benchmark Assignment- Change Initiative Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

4. Good

21.75 points

Discussion of necessary change agents and their respective roles in implementing change is included, but discussion is cursory and lacking in depth.

3. Satisfactory

19.75 points

Discussion of necessary change agents and their respective roles in implementing change is discussed, including all necessary elements.

2. Less than Satisfactory

18.5 points

Discussion of necessary change agents and their respective roles in implementing change is incomplete or inaccurate.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Discussion of necessary change agents and their respective roles in implementing change is not included.

Application of the Change Model to Develop Strategies (B)

25 points

Criteria Description

Application of the Change Model to Develop Strategies Develop strategy for implementing and managing change within an organization. (C 3.5, 6.5)

5. Excellent

25 points

The change model is thoroughly applied and the resulting strategies include all necessary elements.

4. Good

21.75 points

The change model is thoroughly applied with rich detail and the resulting strategies include all necessary elements.

3. Satisfactory

19.75 points

The change model is applied, but the resulting strategies are cursory and lacking in depth.

2. Less than Satisfactory

18.5 points

The change model is applied, but the resulting strategies are incomplete or inaccurate.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

The change model is not applied to develop strategies.

Overcoming Barriers to Change (B)

25 points

Criteria Description

Overcoming Barriers to Change Demonstrate flexibility and adaptability in response to changing or unknown circumstances. (C 1.5)

5. Excellent

25 points

Overcoming barriers to change is thoroughly presented with rich detail and includes discussion of all necessary elements.

4. Good

21.75 points

Overcoming barriers to change is presented and includes discussion of all necessary elements.

3. Satisfactory

19.75 points

Overcoming barriers to change is presented, but it is cursory and lacking in depth.

2. Less than Satisfactory

18.5 points

Overcoming barriers to change is presented, but it is incomplete or inaccurate.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Overcoming barriers to change is not addressed.

Evaluation Methods

25 points

Criteria Description

Evaluation Methods

5. Excellent

25 points

Evaluation methods for determining the success of the change initiative are extremely thorough with specific metrics or measurable determinants clearly defined and numerous relevant details.

4. Good

21.75 points

Evaluation methods for determining the success of the change initiative are complete and include specific metrics or measurable determinants and relevant details.

3. Satisfactory

19.75 points

Evaluation methods for determining the success of the change initiative are included but lack specific metrics or measurable determinants and relevant details.

2. Less than Satisfactory

18.5 points

Evaluation methods for determining the success of the change initiative are incomplete or inaccurate.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Evaluation methods for determining the success of the change initiative are not included.

Strategies for Sustaining Change

12.5 points

Criteria Description

Strategies for Sustaining Change

5. Excellent

12.5 points

Strategies for sustaining change are thoroughly presented with rich detail and include discussion of all necessary elements.

4. Good

10.88 points

Strategies for sustaining change are complete and include discussion of all necessary elements.

3. Satisfactory

9.88 points

Strategies for sustaining change are presented, but discussion is cursory and lacking in depth.

2. Less than Satisfactory

9.25 points

Strategies for sustaining change are incomplete or inaccurate.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Strategies for sustaining change are not addressed.

Overall Effectiveness of Change Plan

12.5 points

Criteria Description

Overall Effectiveness of Change Plan

5. Excellent

12.5 points

Discussion of how the change plan supports the organizational mission and goals, addresses stakeholder concerns, and contributes to the community of society is thoroughly presented with rich detail and includes discussion of all necessary elements.

4. Good

10.88 points

Discussion of how the change plan supports the organizational mission and goals, addresses stakeholder concerns, and contributes to the community of society is presented and includes discussion of all necessary elements.

3. Satisfactory

9.88 points

Discussion of how the change plan supports the organizational mission and goals, addresses stakeholder concerns, and contributes to the community of society is cursory and lacking in depth.

2. Less than Satisfactory

9.25 points

Discussion of how the change plan supports the organizational mission and goals, addresses stakeholder concerns, and contributes to the community of society is incomplete or inaccurate.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Discussion of how the change plan supports the organizational mission and goals, addresses stakeholder concerns, and contributes to the community of society is not included.

Thesis Development and Purpose

7.5 points

Criteria Description

Thesis Development and Purpose

5. Excellent

7.5 points

Thesis is comprehensive and contains the essence of the paper. Thesis statement makes the purpose of the paper clear.

4. Good

6.53 points

Thesis is clear and forecasts the development of the paper. Thesis is descriptive and reflective of the arguments and appropriate to the purpose.

3. Satisfactory

5.93 points

Thesis is apparent and appropriate to purpose.

2. Less than Satisfactory

5.55 points

Thesis is insufficiently developed or vague. Purpose is not clear.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Paper lacks any discernible overall purpose or organizing claim.

Argument Logic and Construction

12.5 points

Criteria Description

Argument Logic and Construction

5. Excellent

12.5 points

Clear and convincing argument that presents a persuasive claim in a distinctive and compelling manner. All sources are authoritative.

4. Good

10.88 points

Argument shows logical progressions. Techniques of argumentation are evident. There is a smooth progression of claims from introduction to conclusion. Most sources are authoritative.

3. Satisfactory

9.88 points

Argument is orderly, but may have a few inconsistencies. The argument presents minimal justification of claims. Argument logically, but not thoroughly, supports the purpose. Sources used are credible. Introduction and conclusion bracket the thesis.

2. Less than Satisfactory

9.25 points

Sufficient justification of claims is lacking. Argument lacks consistent unity. There are obvious flaws in the logic. Some sources have questionable credibility.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Statement of purpose is not justified by the conclusion. The conclusion does not support the claim made. Argument is incoherent and uses noncredible sources.

Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar, and language use)

12.5 points

Criteria Description

Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar, and language use)

5. Excellent

12.5 points

Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present. The writer uses a variety of effective sentence structures and figures of speech.

4. Good

10.88 points

Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but they are not overly distracting to the reader. Correct and varied sentence structure and audience-appropriate language are employed.

3. Satisfactory

9.88 points

The writer is clearly in command of standard, written, academic English.

2. Less than Satisfactory

9.25 points

Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader. Inconsistencies in language choice (register) or word choice are present. Sentence structure is correct but not varied.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning. Inappropriate word choice or sentence construction is employed.

Paper Format (use of appropriate style for the major and assignment)

5 points

Criteria Description

Paper Format (use of appropriate style for the major and assignment)

5. Excellent

5 points

All format elements are correct.

4. Good

4.35 points

Appropriate template is fully used. There are virtually no errors in formatting style.

3. Satisfactory

3.95 points

Appropriate template is used, but some elements are missing or mistaken. A lack of control with formatting is apparent.

2. Less than Satisfactory

3.7 points

Appropriate template is used. Formatting is correct, although some minor errors may be present.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Template is not used appropriately or documentation format is rarely followed correctly.

Documentation of Sources

12.5 points

Criteria Description

Documentation of Sources (citations, footnotes, references, bibliography, etc., as appropriate to assignment and style)

5. Excellent

12.5 points

Sources are completely and correctly documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, and format is free of error.

4. Good

10.88 points

Sources are documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, and format is mostly correct.

3. Satisfactory

9.88 points

Sources are documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, although some formatting errors may be present.

2. Less than Satisfactory

9.25 points

Documentation of sources is inconsistent or incorrect, as appropriate to assignment and style, with numerous formatting errors.

1. Unsatisfactory

0 points

Sources are not documented.

Total 250 points

EHR Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

My current health setting is serving many patients and so, keeping the patients records in an organized and accessible manner is essential for the medical practice on the organization. Often, the medical records entails vital information about every patient such as the diagnosis, the kinds of medications that are taking, prescriptions, test results, personal addresses, billing information, social security numbers, and other personal data. Therefore, it is imperative to store the medical records in an effective way to facilitate access by the staff and also ensuring safety of the patients’ information. Notably, my organization still heavily relies on traditional paper-based records. However, this paper-based health record keeping is increasing more burdens to already overwhelmed filing system.  As a result, confusion, inconsistencies, and misguided choices in the provision of health care have been witnessed due to the complexities of the paper-based health records.  Essentially, the challenges associated with keeping health records manually are adequate proof that the paper-based system is hindering health care practices. For instance, paper-based health records involve many bulky files that make portability a problem. Besides, manual records are prone to incorrect entries that may take long to correct and/ or explain. The health care providers also tend to take remarkably long time to review patient files, the time that would have been utilized to attend to many patients or dedicated to other vital duties. Additionally, it is time consuming to update patient files. Besides, more efforts are required to ensure patients’ private information is safeguarded.

Consequently, electronic health records (EHRs) has been proposed as the change initiative to remedy the challenges emanating from the paper-based health records. Amply, EHRs refers to a digital adaptation of the patients’ paper chart such as reducing incidences of lost records, duplication, mistaken identity, inefficient billing, errors in drug administration, and making uninformed clinical decisions. Therefore, the implementation of EHRs is timely since it is expected to address the challenges of paper-based records. Ideally, the adoption of EHRs is necessitated by both internal and external forces. Regarding the external driving forces, the environment health care industry is rapidly evolving and becoming uniquely competitive. As such, it is imperative for health care organization to create strategies that are focused on internal environment to enhance competitive capability of the organization. The strategies may include health care cost reduction and quality care provision. In turn, adoption of EHRs will ensure the realization of these goals in the organization (Kruse, DeShazo, Kim & Fulton, 2014).

On the other hand, internal driving forces for EHRs include enhancement of quality of care. EHRs provide are real-time, patient-focused records that avails information immediately and safely to certified users. Other than having patient medical and treatment history, the EHRs system can also provides a wider perspective of patient care due to its ability to enable accessibility to evidence-based tools that can help health care professionals to make informed decision about patients’ care. The people who will be affected by EHRs adoption include health care providers and the patients. EHRs will foster the work of health care providers by automating and simplifying their workflow. EHRs will ensure real-time communication while providing care, eradicate time wasted in scrutinizing and discussing patient data, and ensure the privacy of patient health information. On the other side, EHRs will affect patients by addressing concerns such as confidentiality, security, and patient-centered care provision. Besides, the patients will benefit from improved quality of health care provision, reduced cost of care, and reduction in time spent in hospital.

The EHRs implementation involves various key stakeholders. They include

Clinicians

Clinicians include nurses, physicians, and allied health professionals. They are in forefront to provide clinical services to patients and so, they expect that the patients’ records are accurate and updated to foster appropriate treatment, diagnosis, and positive health outcomes.

            The Management Team

The administration will play a vital role in advancing the change initiative or acting a barrier to change efforts. A dedicated executive team would ensure adequate support for change by providing necessary support to enable change implementation is completed within set time frame and budget, meets the expectations of clinicians, improves the organization’s standing for quality health care, and ensuring change is implemented with minimal interference.

            Front Office Staff

These stakeholders are vital due to their responsibility of ensuring input of crucial patient information such as billing, demographic, and contact information in the EHR system.

Other stakeholders include the compliance officer who will be expected to ensure meaningful use needs, patient safety officer to ensure accuracy and completeness of vital data sets, and health information management director to ensure appropriate handling and validation of records.

Change leaders play an important role in EHRs implementation by focusing on the people and process. The key roles include communication by unearthing and explaining the rationale for change to the staff. Explaining the reasons for change and linking it to the organization’s values results in better change buy-in and ensures creation of urgency for change.  Change leaders also ensure collaboration by involving the employees in decision making, thus, inspiring employees’ commitment to change. The other vital role of change leaders is commitment to change by supporting it through belief and behaviors. To guide the change process, the Rogers’ diffusion of innovations (DOI) theory may be used. The theory is used to deductively seek factors that may facilitate the diffusion of EHRs intervention in the health care setting (Aizstrauta, Ginters & Eroles, 2015). The elements of focus in this theory include innovation, channels of communication, and social system.  Under the innovation, the focus will be on characteristics that may influence EHRs adoption such as compatibility, complexity, and relative advantage (Lin et al., 2016)

Change agents are internal or external players who are involved in critical role of promoting the change (Alagoz et al., 2018). In the present case, the change agents will include the following;

Change Driver

These change agents will be responsible for driving the EHRs change from the top by making the decision to adopt the system, set implementation goals, and eventually taking responsibility for the success or failure of the change initiative.

Change Champions

These are people who act as the good will ambassadors of the change. Their roles include actively supporting the transformation to EHRs, communicating the essence of adopting EHRs and the overall affirmative influence of the practice on the transition.

            Change Implementers

They are people who ensure the change materializes by implementing software, evaluating software and hardware requirements, providing and coordinating support and services, and managing software upgrades and maintenance to ensure the success of the project. Key stakeholders here include IT experts and project manager.

The change model that will be used is Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH). This model of care strives to strengthen the basis of health care system by changing the care provisions of the primary care providers. PCMH focus primarily on patients in the health care system through increasing the access and enhancing alternatives for patient-provider communication. The EHRs innovative approaches to manage patients with intricate needs include referral racking systems, high-risk patient registries, and electronic visits. EHRs will foster the implementation of PCMH by allowing providers to effectively coordinate care for patients including the ones with intricate needs (Health Information Technology, 2019). The strategic aspect of using the model include establishment of a climate for change through creating a strong project team. This team would examine the internal resources such as processes, technology, and human resources to determine PCMH recognition.  Consequently, a realistic expectation would be established to eradicate fear and ensure the model is implemented in time. The other strategy is involving and enabling the organization. This strategy is realized by creating awareness of changes to the patients on the care model and what the model mean for them. The final strategy is to implement and sustain the changes by updating the PCMH workflows and systems founded on feedback. The employees who show great commitment to the transformation process should be identified and rewarded.

It is anticipated that the implementation process will be met by several barriers such as financial constraints, negative attitudes, organizational limitations, and resistance to change.  However, the organizations can address these issues through training and effective communication prior to initiation of implementation process. Besides, the organization can deploy some employees to act as good will ambassadors to guide and motivate stakeholders to accept the change. Likewise, the financial issues can be tackled by engaging vendors to develop cost-effective EHRs solutions. To deal with emerging and unforeseen situations that could derail the project, it is advisable to use a systematic approach of change evaluation including innovation, proper planning, and flexibility for eventualities.

The evaluation methods that will be used to determine the level of success include facilitating the practice with routine, tailored follow up to determine the success of the change strategy in the organization (Alagoz et al., 2018). Besides, other methods include use of audits and feedback. Moreover, the organization can also use formative evaluation method. This method provides instant feedbacks essential in making corrections midway or for enhancing the next version. Formative evaluation tend to answer crucial implementation questions including whether or not the system is working, or determine if the process is complicated or not. The metrics that will be used to measure the success include components such as performance measure, reliability, usability, interoperability standards, usefulness, and customized tradeoffs.

To support continuous change, Silver et al., (2016) argue that quality improvement initiatives need to be the culture of working instead of adding other things on the routine clinical care. Consequently, continuous change will be ensured through initiating plans for enduring changes. It is imperative to begin the EHRs with a solid basis that can easily be consistently evolved and maximized. Moreover, continuous improvement encompasses incremental efforts and innovations to realize the best practices. Therefore, all the expectations and goals of the change initiative should be disseminated to stakeholders succinctly. Essentially, inspiring and executing incentive plans is crucial in establishing a culture of continuous change. On the other hand, ensuring a consistent, structured follow up training on the essence of EHRs in the organization is also importantly in ensuring continuous change in the entire organization.

Essentially, the fundamental goals of the health care organization is to ensure provision of quality health care, improve safety in health, reduce costs, and eliminate substantial amount of time for hospital visitation. In turn, EHRs addresses these concerns by improving quality of care through provision of real-time, patient-focused records that avails information immediately and safely to certified users. The EHRs system can also provides a wider perspective of patient care due to its ability to enable accessibility to evidence-based tools that can help health care professionals to make informed decision about patients’ care. These services eventually reduce health care costs. Essentially the key concerns by stakeholders such as the EHRs interoperability with other systems in health care such as billing systems, practice operations and productivity of the EHRs, and financial implications including how EHRs will equitably contribute to the society can be addressed through effective communication and training on the meaningful use of the EHRs system.

 

 

References

 

Aizstrauta, D., Ginters, E., & Eroles, M. A. P. (2015). Applying theory of diffusion of innovations to evaluate technology acceptance and sustainability. Procedia Computer Science, 43, 69-77.

Alagoz, E., Chih, M. Y., Hitchcock, M., Brown, R., & Quanbeck, A. (2018). The use of external change agents to promote quality improvement and organizational change in healthcare organizations: a systematic review. BMC health services research, 18(1), 42.

Health Information Technology (2019). Change Management in EHR Implementation. Retrieved 17 October 2019, from https://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/playbook/pdf/change-management-ehr-implemention.pdf

Kruse, C. S., DeShazo, J., Kim, F., & Fulton, L. (2014). Factors associated with adoption of health information technology: a conceptual model based on a systematic review. JMIR medical informatics, 2(1), e9.

Lin, C. P., Guirguis-Blake, J., Keppel, G. A., Dobie, S., Osborn, J., Cole, A. M., & Baldwin, L. M. (2016). Using the diffusion of innovations theory to assess socio-technical factors in planning the implementation of an electronic health record alert across multiple primary care clinics. Journal of innovation in health informatics, 23(1), 450.

Silver, S. A., McQuillan, R., Harel, Z., Weizman, A. V., Thomas, A., Nesrallah, G., … & Chertow, G. M. (2016). How to sustain change and support continuous quality improvement. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 11(5), 916-924.

View Rubrics

Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability – Rubric

No of Criteria: 15 Achievement Levels: 5

Criteria

Achievement Levels

Description

Percentage

Unsatisfactory

0.00 %

Less than Satisfactory

74.00 %

Satisfactory

79.00 %

Good

87.00 %

Excellent

100.00 %

Content

80.0

The Need for Change

10.0

The need for change including specifying the issue and the current outcomes resulting from the issue is not discussed. Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

The need for change including specifying the issue and the current outcomes resulting from the issue is discussed, but discussion is incomplete or inaccurate.

The need for change including specifying the issue and the current outcomes resulting from the issue is included, but discussion is cursory and lacking in depth.

The need for change including specifying the issue and the current outcomes resulting from the issue is discussed, including all necessary elements.

The need for change including specifying the issue and the current outcomes resulting from the issue is thoroughly discussed with rich detail, including all necessary elements.

Driving Forces

5.0

Description of internal and/or external driving forces, contributing issues, and people affected is not included.

Description of internal and/or external driving forces, contributing issues, and people affected is incomplete or inaccurate. Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

Description of internal and/or external driving forces, contributing issues, and people affected is included, but discussion is cursory and lacking in depth.

Description of internal and/or external driving forces, contributing issues, and people affected is discussed, including all necessary elements.

Description of internal and/or external driving forces, contributing issues, and people affected is thoroughly discussed with rich detail, including all necessary elements.

Stakeholder Evaluation

5.0

Evaluation of stakeholders and how they will be affected by the change initiative is not included.

Evaluation of stakeholders and how they will be affected by the change initiative is incomplete or inaccurate.

Evaluation of stakeholders and how they will be affected by the change initiative is included, but discussion is cursory and lacking in depth. Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

Evaluation of stakeholders and how they will be affected by the change initiative is discussed, including all necessary elements.

Evaluation of stakeholders and how they will be affected by the change initiative is thoroughly discussed with rich detail, including all necessary elements.

The Role of the Leader in the Change Initiative

10.0

The role of the leader in the change initiative is not addressed.

The role of the leader in the change initiative is present, but it is incomplete or inaccurate.

The role of the leader in the change initiative is presented, but it is cursory and lacking in depth.

The role of the leader in the change initiative is presented and includes discussion of all necessary elements.

The role of the leader in the change initiative is thoroughly presented with rich detail and includes discussion of all necessary elements.

Change Agents and Roles

10.0

Discussion of necessary change agents and their respective roles in implementing change is not included.

Discussion of necessary change agents and their respective roles in implementing change is incomplete or inaccurate.

Discussion of necessary change agents and their respective roles in implementing change is included, but discussion is cursory and lacking in depth.

Discussion of necessary change agents and their respective roles in implementing change is discussed, including all necessary elements.

Discussion of necessary change agents and their respective roles in implementing change is thoroughly discussed with rich detail, including all necessary elements.

Application of the Change Model to Develop Strategies (Competency 3.5)

10.0 Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

The change model is not applied to develop strategies.

The change model is applied, but the resulting strategies are incomplete or inaccurate.

The change model is applied, but the resulting strategies are cursory and lacking in depth.

The change model is thoroughly applied and the resulting strategies include all necessary elements.

The change model is thoroughly applied with rich detail and the resulting strategies include all necessary elements.

Overcoming Barriers to Change (Competency 1.5)

10.0

Overcoming barriers to change is not addressed.

Overcoming barriers to change is presented, but it is incomplete or inaccurate.

Overcoming barriers to change is presented, but it is cursory and lacking in depth.

Overcoming barriers to change is presented and includes discussion of all necessary elements.

Overcoming barriers to change is thoroughly presented with rich detail and includes discussion of all necessary elements.

Evaluation Methods Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

10.0

Evaluation methods for determining the success of the change initiative are not included.

Evaluation methods for determining the success of the change initiative are incomplete or inaccurate.

Evaluation methods for determining the success of the change initiative are included but lack specific metrics or measurable determinants and relevant details.

Evaluation methods for determining the success of the change initiative are complete and include specific metrics or measurable determinants and relevant details.

Evaluation methods for determining the success of the change initiative are extremely thorough with specific metrics or measurable determinants clearly defined and numerous relevant details.

Strategies for Sustaining Change

5.0

Strategies for sustaining change are not addressed.

Strategies for sustaining change are incomplete or inaccurate.

Strategies for sustaining change are presented, but discussion is cursory and lacking in depth.

Strategies for sustaining change are complete and include discussion of all necessary elements.

Strategies for sustaining change are thoroughly presented with rich detail and include discussion of all necessary elements. Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

Overall Effectiveness of Change Plan

5.0

Discussion of how the change plan supports the organizational mission and goals, addresses stakeholder concerns, and contributes to the community of society is not included.

Discussion of how the change plan supports the organizational mission and goals, addresses stakeholder concerns, and contributes to the community of society is incomplete or inaccurate.

Discussion of how the change plan supports the organizational mission and goals, addresses stakeholder concerns, and contributes to the community of society is cursory and lacking in depth.

Discussion of how the change plan supports the organizational mission and goals, addresses stakeholder concerns, and contributes to the community of society is presented and includes discussion of all necessary elements.

Discussion of how the change plan supports the organizational mission and goals, addresses stakeholder concerns, and contributes to the community of society is thoroughly presented with rich detail and includes discussion of all necessary elements. Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

Organization and Effectiveness

13.0

 

Thesis Development and Purpose

3.0

Paper lacks any discernible overall purpose or organizing claim.

Thesis is insufficiently developed or vague. Purpose is not clear.

Thesis is apparent and appropriate to purpose .

Thesis is clear and forecasts the development of the paper. Thesis is descriptive and reflective of the arguments and appropriate to the purpose.

Thesis is comprehensive and contains the essence of the paper. Thesis statement makes the purpose of the paper clear.

Argument Logic and Construction

5.0

Statement of purpose is not justified by the conclusion. The conclusion does not support the claim made. Argument is incoherent and uses noncredible sources.

Sufficient justification of claims is lacking. Argument lacks consistent unity. There are obvious flaws in the logic. Some sources have questionable credibility.

Argument is orderly, but may have a few inconsistencies. The argument presents minimal justification of claims. Argument logically, but not thoroughly, supports the purpose. Sources used are credible. Introduction and conclusion bracket the thesis.

Argument shows logical progressions. Techniques of argumentation are evident. There is a smooth progression of claims from introduction to conclusion. Most sources are authoritative.

Clear and convincing argument that presents a persuasive claim in a distinctive and compelling manner. All sources are authoritative. Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

Mechanics of Writing (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar, and language use)

5.0

Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning. Inappropriate word choice or sentence construction is employed.

Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader. Inconsistencies in language choice (register) or word choice are present. Sentence structure is correct but not varied.

Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but they are not overly distracting to the reader. Correct and varied sentence structure and audience-appropriate language are employed.

Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present. The writer uses a variety of effective sentence structures and figures of speech.

The writer is clearly in command of standard, written, academic English.

Format

7.0

 

Paper Format (use of appropriate style for the major and assignment)

2.0

Template is not used appropriately or documentation format is rarely followed correctly.

Appropriate template is used, but some elements are missing or mistaken. A lack of control with formatting is apparent. Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

Appropriate template is used. Formatting is correct, although some minor errors may be present.

Appropriate template is fully used. There are virtually no errors in formatting style.

All format elements are correct.

Documentation of Sources (citations, footnotes, references, bibliography, etc., as appropriate to assignment and style)

5.0

Sources are not documented.

Documentation of sources is inconsistent or incorrect, as appropriate to assignment and style, with numerous formatting errors.

Sources are documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, although some formatting errors may be present.

Sources are documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, and format is mostly correct.

Sources are completely and correctly documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, and format is free of error.

Topic 8 DQ 1

Consider an organization in your field or industry. Describe the essential systems necessary to facilitate continuous change without compromising quality or causing burnout among employees. Describe three factors to consider when making sure that the changes made become permanently imbedded in the organization’s culture. Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

When embarking on a change process, communication is critical to ensure effective outcomes in the overall process. It is also important for stakeholders to be involved throughout the entire change process; therefore, they must be informed about the objectives of change initiatives and allowed an opportunity to share their own ideas and thoughts. Change is inevitable; however, change must not result in confusion and complete chaos within an organization in which changes are being introduced.

Although the Toyota Motor Company developed the Lean principles and practices, other organizations both public and private worldwide have successfully employed this process (Balzer et al., 2016). Applying a lean approach to continuous improvement provides a method to examine operational processes. According to Al-Haddad & Kotnour (2015), the benefits of lean continuous improvement are improved work processes, reduced costs and errors, and increased employee morale and productivity. The lean continuous improvement process involves three key concepts: purpose, process and people (as cited in Al-Haddad & Kotnour, 2015). This includes clearly defining the change effort and aligning it to the organization’s goals and vision. In addition, determine who and how stakeholders are impacted, provide effective training, and implement a supportive environment.

References

Al-Haddad, S., & Kotnour, T. (2015). Integrating the organizational change literature: A model for successful change. Journal of Organizational Change Management, 28(2), 234-262. https://doi.org/10.1108/jocm-11-2013-02

Balzer, W. K., Francis, D. E., Krehbiel, T. C., &Shea, N. (2016). A review and perspective on lean in higher education. Quality Assurance in Education, 24(4), 442-462. https://doi.org/10.1108/qae-03-2015-0011

Topic 8 DQ 2

What is your reaction to change in your personal history? What personal tools do you implement to help yourself navigate change? Benchmark – Change Initiative: Implementation, Evaluation, and Sustainability

In the field of technology and software development, facilitating continuous change without compromising quality or causing burnout among employees is crucial to staying competitive and innovative. To achieve this, several essential systems must be in place (HealthIT.gov; Kotter & Cohen, 2012).

Essential Systems for Facilitating Continuous Change:

Agile Development Methodology: Implementing an Agile development methodology, such as Scrum or Kanban, can help in managing continuous change effectively. Agile principles emphasize collaboration, adaptability, and iterative development (HealthIT.gov). Cross-functional teams work on small, manageable tasks with regular feedback and review cycles, reducing the likelihood of burnout by ensuring a sustainable pace of work.

DevOps Practices: A robust DevOps (Development and Operations) culture is essential for continuous change. DevOps promotes automation, collaboration, and continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) (HealthIT.gov). By automating repetitive tasks and streamlining the software delivery process, organizations can reduce the stress on employees and maintain high-quality standards.

Learning and Development Programs: To prevent burnout and promote employee growth, invest in comprehensive learning and development programs (Kotter & Cohen, 2012). These programs should focus on both technical skills and soft skills, fostering a culture of continuous learning. Encourage employees to acquire new skills, and provide opportunities for them to experiment and innovate in a safe environment.

Factors for Permanently Embedding Changes in Organizational Culture:

Leadership Commitment: Leadership plays a critical role in embedding changes in an organization’s culture (Kotter & Cohen, 2012). Leaders must champion the changes and consistently demonstrate their commitment through actions and communication. When leaders model the desired behavior, employees are more likely to embrace and adopt new practices.

Clear Communication: Effective communication is key to ensuring that changes become ingrained in the culture (Kotter & Cohen, 2012). Communicate the reasons behind the changes, the expected benefits, and the impact on employees’ roles and responsibilities. Create channels for feedback and address concerns promptly. Regularly update employees on progress and celebrate milestones to maintain enthusiasm.

Alignment with Values and Incentives: Ensure that the changes align with the organization’s core values and are supported by appropriate incentives (Kotter & Cohen, 2012). When employees see that the changes align with the company’s mission and values, they are more likely to embrace them. Incentives can include recognition, rewards, or career development opportunities tied to the successful implementation of new practices.

In summary, continuous change in the technology and software development field requires a foundation built on Agile methodologies, DevOps practices, and a strong commitment to employee growth and well-being (HealthIT.gov). To make these changes a permanent part of the organizational culture, leaders should lead by example, communicate effectively, and align the changes with the company’s values and incentives (Kotter & Cohen, 2012). By doing so, organizations can adapt and thrive in an ever-evolving industry while maintaining high-quality standards and employee satisfaction.

Reference:

 

Benefits of health IT | HealthIT.gov. (n.d.). https://www.healthit.gov/topic/health-it-and-health-information-exchange-basics/benefits-health-it

 

Kotter, J. P., & Cohen, D. S. (2012). The heart of change real-life stories of how people change their organizations. Harvard Business Review Press.