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Topic 4 DQ 1 Are their professional barriers to being involved with the legislative process, such as retaliation from institutions or individuals who do not share your same viewpoints?

Topic 4 DQ 1 Are there professional barriers to being involved with the legislative process, such as retaliation from institutions or individuals who do not share your same viewpoints?

Are there professional barriers to being involved with the legislative process, such as retaliation from institutions or individuals who do not share your same viewpoints

 

Re: Topic 4 DQ 1

Participation in some legislative initiatives and processes as a healthcare worker can benefit both individuals and the organizations for which they work. While there are several advantages, there can also be barriers and the possibility of retaliation when staff becomes involved in what can be characterized as contentious issues among people who do not always share the same perspectives. Healthcare policy is required because “the playing field for health care is not level; effective policy processes that actively incorporate key stakeholders are critical” (Weberg et al., 2019, p. 436). These policies and processes are intended to level the playing field, but the task is not always easy. The processes “demand fortitude, time, perseverance, and the capacity to build effective and lasting relationships” (Weberg et al., 2019, p. 436). These relationships can assist staff in ensuring that “they understand the issue, the objectives of the proposal, the specific language chosen, and how the proposals fit within existing law” (Weberg, et al., 2019, p. 455).

There should never be retaliation from the institution or individuals as long as there is no harm inflicted on our patients as a result of policy changes. Change is often difficult, but it is frequently rewarded with excellent results. As an advanced practice registered nurse

(APRN), it is critical to advocate for and protect our staff in a variety of situations. Every member of staff is entitled to their own point of view, and differing points of view are the foundation of this world. When someone’s point of view differs from ours, we should not counterattack. Schedules, time off, and tasks should not be retaliated against as a hopeful future APRN in healthcare administration. The same standards should apply as they do now in order to avoid retaliation based on race, gender, religion, and so on. The nurse leader should also “spend time with legislative committee staff so that they can effectively articulate the reasons for legislators’ proposals as they move ahead” (Weberg et al, 2019. P. 455). APRNs must be able to communicate relevant information and explain why it is important to our employees.

Reference

Weberg, D.R., Mangold, K., Porter-OGrady, T., Malloch, K. (2019). Leadership in nursing practice: changing the landscape of health care. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Re: Topic 4 DQ 1

Hi LaShionna,

Thank you for your post. Change is never easy, but sometimes it is necessary. Our healthcare system is outdated and lagging behind many other advanced hospital system all over the world. The healthcare system in our country is in need of massive transformation that requires leaders and other stakeholders to put aside their differences and reservations and focus on the important element of healthcare, our patients and the public. For APRN’s who advocate for patient care, public health and healthcare reform, they can face backlash and various forms of professional retaliation as they can ruffle the feathers of institutions, business and individuals who bottom line may be impacted, especially those in the business of putting profit over patients and the publics health. This is why as a nurse leaders, we have to be bold, daring and steadfast when it comes to fighting for the health and wellbeing of our patients, colleagues and the public. Our healthcare system should put people over profit. As stated earlier, although change can be hard, change is sometimes needed in order to fix a broken system. Are there professional barriers to being involved with the legislative process

Re: Topic 4 DQ 1

“Although nurses constitute the largest segment of the health care workforce in the United States, their participation in all levels of health policy advocacy remains low” (Lewinski & Simmons, 2018). This can be due to many reasons such as lack of encouragement from leadership, or fear of the unknown or complexity of legislation. As much as all those things are true there needs to be a push for more nurse involvement in politics. “Nurses have vast expertise about the health care needs of both patients and communities, and should lead the way in setting health policy priorities…” (Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2014). I believe that there is going to be some push back from employers or others who do not have the same view but that does not mean there should be any backing down. I strongly believe the answer to many questions is education. Being able to listen, not just hear, people with opposing viewpoints, and try to see where they come from is a solid characteristic to possess. By educating yourself on the opposing view does not necessarily mean you are going to change your mind, but it does allow room for compromise. There has been pushes for nursing unions in many areas around the country. It has not quite reached my area yet but that does not mean that I do not want to educate myself on the shift. I feel that it may give the wrong impression to my employer about union talk being present, but they should present their view on unions and be truthful as to how it would affect the nurses, the hospital, and the patients. Are there professional barriers to being involved with the legislative process

Topic 4 DQ 1 Are their professional barriers to being involved with the legislative process, such as retaliation from institutions or individuals who do not share your same viewpoints

Topic 4 DQ 1 Are their professional barriers to being involved with the legislative process, such as retaliation from institutions or individuals who do not share your same viewpoints

Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS:Topic 4 DQ 1 Are there professional barriers to being involved with the legislative process, such as retaliation from institutions or individuals who do not share your same viewpoints?

Lewinski, A. A., & Simmons, L. A. (2018). Nurse Knowledge and Engagement in Health Policy Making: Findings From a Pilot Study. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing49(9), 407–415. https://doi.org/10.3928/00220124-20180813-06

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. (2014). Preparing nurses for leadership in public policy. Retrieved May 13, 2021, from https://www.rwjf.org/en/library/articles-and-news/2014/02/preparing-nurses-for-leadership-in-public-policy.html

S. Scott and P. Scott (2020) suggest that nurses are enmeshed in patient care activities that they don’t see the bigger picture of patient advocacy at the local, state, or national level. I believe this is a correct statement and is a barrier to active public policy advocacy for nurses. As a professional nurse, I find myself immersed in the world of providing optimal care for each patient. While this is an altruistic endeavor, the bigger picture of participation in health policy is to provide optimal care for all patients through legislation. One example is nurse-patient ratios that allow for safe, quality care for each patient. Being active in public policy legislation or lobbying is one way that nursing can share the knowledge of direct care with lawmakers and the public. This could be a significant contribution toward establishing policies to improve health care in the nation.

References

Scott, S. M., & Scott, P. A. (2020). Nursing, advocacy and public policy. NURSING ETHICS. https://doi-org.lopes.idm.oclc.org/10.1177/0969733020961823

Second Response:
Writing
6 (6%) – 6 (6%)

Communication is professional and respectful to colleagues.

Response to faculty questions are fully answered, if posed.

Provides clear, concise opinions and ideas that are supported by two or more credible sources.

Response is effectively written in standard, edited English.

5 (5%) – 5 (5%)

Communication is mostly professional and respectful to colleagues.

Response to faculty questions are mostly answered, if posed.

Provides opinions and ideas that are supported by few credible sources.

Response is written in standard, edited English.

4 (4%) – 4 (4%)

Response posed in the Discussion may lack effective professional communication.

Response to faculty questions are somewhat answered, if posed.

Few or no credible sources are cited.

0 (0%) – 3 (3%)

Responses posted in the Discussion lack effective communication.

Response to faculty questions are missing.

No credible sources are cited.

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